Cork men involved in trafficking drugs from Dublin jailed for their parts in operation

Each man entered a signed guilty plea to the case against them
Cork men involved in trafficking drugs from Dublin jailed for their parts in operation

Sergeant Paul Leahy gave evidence at Cork Circuit Criminal Court of how a Dublin man carried €55,000 worth of heroin to Cork for onward transmission.

A Garda surveillance operation intercepted a drug trafficking route from Dublin to Cork and now two Cork men have been jailed for the parts they played in the operation.

Sergeant Paul Leahy gave evidence at Cork Circuit Criminal Court of how a Dublin man carried €55,000 worth of heroin to Cork for onward transmission.

The modus operandi entailed the Dublin man travelling by bus to Cork and getting off at Merchants Quay.

At the bus station the plan was to meet a Cork man who would guide him to the third man to whom he would transfer the heroin.

Without talking or giving any appearance of being in each other’s company the Dublin man and the guiding local man would get on to a bus and travel to Gurranabraher and walk to St. Mary’s Avenue off Cathedral Road. On this quiet cul de sac the Dublin man would pass the drugs to a third man waiting on an electric bike.

As this was about to happen, gardaí emerged from their concealed positions and arrested all three parties.

The Dublin man was not before the court.

The man who led him from Merchants Quay to St. Mary’s Avenue without ever handling the heroin himself was 42-year-old Roy Twohig.

The man on the bicycle who was to receive the package was William Kenny, 45.

Both men were homeless and living at the time at St. Vincent’s hostel on Anglesea Terrace in Cork.

Now at Cork Circuit Criminal Court Judge Sarah Berkeley has jailed Kenny for four and a half years. Twohig was jailed for two years. Twohig indicated that he was to have been paid €100 for his part in the crime.

Differentiating between the two parties, Judge Berkeley said of Kenny, “His level of participation in the crime was at a high level of culpability. He was described by Sergeant Leahy as the organiser in facilitating the crime and involved in the sale or supply of the drug in the city of Cork.

“He recruited Mr Twohig and he (Kenny) has serious relevant crime.

“He made admissions. He was homeless and an addict.” 

In all of those circumstances, the judge set a sentence at seven years but suspended the last two and a half years of it.

Judge Berkeley noted that Kenny accepted that he played a greater part in the crime and that his co-accused Roy Twohig had only played a small part in the enterprise.

In respect of Twohig, the judge said, “There was an early plea of guilty. He was homeless and had a drug addiction. He had a limited role in the transaction. He has been of good behaviour in prison. He made admissions in relation to his role and he apologised.

“Albeit a smaller role he must have known what was going on. His co-accused said he had recruited Mr Twohig to take the man to the locus.” The judge sentenced him to two years and six months with the six-month portion of the sentence suspended.

Commenting generally on the crime of heroin-dealing, the judge said she had to take into consideration the harm drugs caused to the public.

Roy Twohig and William Kenny both pleaded guilty to having Diamorphine (better known as heroin) for the purpose of sale or supply to others at a time when the street value exceeded €13,000 – the threshold amount which gives rise to mandatory ten-year sentence unless the sentencing judge finds there are exceptional circumstances.

Each man entered a signed guilty plea to the case against them.

The charges against each man relate to St. Mary’s Avenue, off Cathedral Road, Gurranabraher, Cork, on Wednesday, January 19.

More in this section

Sponsored Content

Echo 130Echo 130
EL_music

Podcast: 1000 Cork songs 
Singer/songwriter Jimmy Crowley talks to John Dolan

Listen Here

Add Echolive.ie to your home screen - easy access to Cork news, views, sport and more