Storm Barra: Authorities closely monitoring evolving situation

Met Éireann has issued an orange weather warning for Cork and a red marine warning for the southwest. 
Storm Barra: Authorities closely monitoring evolving situation

Met Éireann has issued an orange weather warning for Cork ahead of the arrival of the storm and says that winds will reach mean speeds of 65 to 80 km/hr on Tuesday with severe or damaging gusts of up to 130 Km/ hr, possibly higher in coastal areas. Picture Denis Minihane.

The National Directorate for Fire and Emergency Management’s (NDFEM) Crisis Management Team, together with stakeholders, is continuing to closely monitor the evolving situation ahead of the arrival of Storm Barra.

Met Éireann has issued an orange weather warning for Cork ahead of the arrival of the storm and says that winds will reach mean speeds of 65 to 80 km/hr on Tuesday with severe or damaging gusts of up to 130 Km/ hr, possibly higher in coastal areas. 

It has warned that disruption to power and travel is likely.

High waves, high tides, heavy rain, and storm surge are also expected to lead to wave overtopping and a significant possibility of coastal flooding.

The warning, which also covers Clare, Kerry, Limerick and Galway will come into effect at 6am tomorrow morning and will remain in place until 6am the following morning.

A yellow warning is in place across the rest of the country.

A status red marine warning has been issued for the area from Mizen Head to Loop Head to Slyne Head with winds expected to reach violent storm-force 11 during Tuesday on Irish coastal waters.

Ahead of the arrival of Storm Barra, the NDFEM Crisis Management Team conducted a virtual coordination meeting yesterday with Met Éireann, the Office of Public Works, local authority severe weather assessment teams and government departments and agencies.

Following the meeting, it urged members of the public to monitor Met Éireann for updated warnings and information and heed local authority advice during this time.

The key public safety messages are:

  • Stay away from all coastal areas for the duration of the Met Éireann warnings. 
  • All road users should be aware of the hazardous traveling conditions, and only necessary journeys should be undertaken. Motorists should slow down and be aware of the dangers of fallen trees and debris. High sided vehicles are particularly vulnerable during this time.
  • As conditions will vary throughout the event, people need to take account of the local conditions and advice from their Local Authority.
  • The public is warned electricity wires are always live, never approach. If you see fallen or damaged wires, keep clear and phone ESB Networks immediately on 1800 372 999/021 238 2410 
  • Should red level warnings be issued, the public are advised to shelter in place for the duration of the warning.

Meanwhile, Cork City Council is also warning the public that there will be a period of high astronomical Spring tides tomorrow morning.

It said it is likely that some roads and parking areas along low-lying quays in the City Centre may suffer localised flooding during high tides such as Morrison’s Quay, Fr Matthew Quay, Trinity Bridge, Union Quay, Sharman Crawford Street, Wandesford Quay, Frenche’s Quay, Proby’s Quay, Crosses Green, Lavitt’s Quay, Kyrl’s Quay and potentially reaching South Terrace, Rutland Street, Sawmill Street and South Mall.

Traffic restrictions may be in place at these locations, during these times.

Morning high tide is at 7.24am.

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