‘Glashaboy works a relief for residents’: Flood scheme work to start

Cork City North-East councillor Ger Keohane said the works will greatly alleviate worry for local home owners.
‘Glashaboy works a relief for residents’: Flood scheme work to start

Local Cllr. Ger Keohane looking at the flooding at Jack O’Callaghan Park in Riverstown, Glanmire, Cork in 2020. Picture Dan Linehan

PROGRESSION of work on the €14m Glashaboy river flood scheme will provide relief to residents who had to leave homes for months after a severe flooding event in 2012, a local councillor has said.

Cork City Council confirmed yesterday that work on the scheme will begin within the next six months, with contractors to be appointed by the end of March.

Flooding in 2012 caused tens of millions of euro of damage to properties in the Glanmire/Sallybrook area, forcing many residents to leave their homes.

Cork City North-East councillor Ger Keohane said the works will greatly alleviate worry for local home owners.

“This work is essential and necessary because people living in homes and businesses got flooded back in 2012 and they experienced several near misses since 2012, right down through the years,” he said.

“They were out of their homes between six and 12 months, they have no flood cover and businesses don’t have flood cover,” said Mr Keohane.

“These works have to be carried out and it’s such a relief for residents and business owners who were decimated by the flooding.”

Mr Keohane said that unfortunately, the project will involve the felling of some trees but that there will be “a tree replacement programme when the scheme is done”.

The Glashaboy river flood relief scheme is designed by the Office of Public Works (OPW) to protect 82 homes and 30 commercial properties in the Glanmire area.

The scheme extends over approximately 4km of the Glashaboy and its tributaries, including 0.5km of the Butlerstown stream, approximately 1.8.km of the Glenmore stream, and short lower reaches of other tributaries.

Lord Mayor of Cork, councillor Colm Kelleher said he is “delighted” to see work begin on the project.

“Local residents and businesses suffered enormously 10 years ago, worrying since about another such event destroying their homes and businesses,” said Mr Kelleher.

“Since then, they campaigned hard for the commencement of this scheme.

“Funded by the OPW, this is one of many flood relief schemes in the pipeline through the Government’s €1bn commitment to flood risk management under the current National Development Plan — Project Ireland 2040.”

The construction works are expected to continue for 32 months and site clearance works, which will require some tree felling, will be carried out in the coming weeks.

The council said that every effort has been made to minimise the impact and an ecologist will be on-site monitoring the works.

As part of the wider flood relief project, bat boxes will be installed, native tree species will be planted, and an extensive hedgerow and wildflower planting programme is also planned to further enhance biodiversity.

The OPW and Cork City Council will also work with the local community to identify further opportunities for tree planting and biodiversity enhancement in the area.

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