Adrian Dunbar calls for UK general election 'as soon as possible'

The Line Of Duty actor said there is a ‘paucity of leadership’
Adrian Dunbar calls for UK general election 'as soon as possible'

Ellie Iorizzo, PA Senior Entertainment Reporter

Line Of Duty star Adrian Dunbar has said he believes there should be a general election in the UK “as soon as possible” because there is a “paucity of leadership”.

The actor (64) said he wanted to “get rid” of the current Conservative government, which includes newly appointed British prime minister Liz Truss and chancellor Kwasi Kwarteng.

When asked on ITV’s Good Morning Britain whether he thinks there should be a general election, Dunbar said: “As soon as possible, yeah.

“Because I think there is a paucity of leadership in the country at the moment, they are a shoddy bunch of people and I think we should get rid of them.”

Conservative Party Conference 2022
British chancellor Kwasi Kwarteng and prime minister Liz Truss (Stefan Rousseau/PA)

He jokingly added: “I think you’ll find come the next election the British public are smarter than you think.”

Dunbar’s comments come after the British government faced the humiliation of a U-turn on income tax cuts for the highest earners.

Speaking about his Line Of Duty character Superintendent Ted Hastings using social media to share his views on politics, Dunbar said: “Satire. Where would we be without it, we don’t have it anymore, would be nice if Spitting Image would come back, that’d be a good idea wouldn’t it.”

The actor said he is keeping his “fingers crossed” that there will be another season of the police drama.

Dunbar also praised writer Frances O’Connor when speaking about his new role playing the on-screen father of Sex Education star Emma Mackey in a film about writer Emily Bronte.

Line of Duty sixth series filming in Belfast
Adrian Dunbar on the set of the sixth series of Line Of Duty (Liam McBurney/PA)

“First of all it’s about the arrival of Frances O’Connor as a writer and director, she’s absolutely brilliant,” he said.

“She had this amazing reimagining of the Bronte story.

“Patrick Bronte, as you know, came from Northern Ireland, goes to Cambridge and ends up in Yorkshire, brings these girls up and I think it’s the tension between the Yorkshire Moors and the aspirational nature of what he was wanting for them, learning French, English, these incredible imaginings that these girls had.

“Frances asked herself the question what were the elements that these girls could do this stuff and that’s what the film is about. It’s a standalone film in its own right I think as well, it’s not a biopic.”

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