95 apartments to be delivered in Cork town; First tranche to be available by March

95 apartments to be delivered in Cork town; First tranche to be available by March

Ninety-five two-bedroom apartments are to be made available in Carrigtwohill through the Local Authority in collaboration with Co-operative Housing Ireland (CHI), with the move-in date for the first units being March 2022.

Ninety-five two-bedroom apartments are to be made available in Carrigtwohill through the local authority in collaboration with Co-operative Housing Ireland (CHI), with the move-in date for the first units being March 2022.

The welcome development is the revamp of an apartment block that has been lying idle for some time. 

The news was confirmed by Cork County Council Senior Executive Officer Seamus De Faoite in response to a query from Carrigtwohill Councillor Anthony Barry who had seen work ongoing in the area.

Mr De Faoite said the Council was engaging with CHI who have engaged with the local developer who has acquired the scheme.

“There are a total of 95 units and they will be delivered, through CHI, in different tranches and phases. The first of these apartment blocks will be delivered by March next year.” 

Mr De Faoite confirmed there was a total of 95 two-bedroom units being made available through CHI with 30 of the apartments to be allocated to older people.

The Council executive said the Local Authority had worked with CHI previously and had a “strong working relationship” with them.

Welcoming the housing provision, Fine Gael Councillor Anthony Barry said he was delighted.

“It is great to see this derelict apartment block being put into use. That building was a blight on the landscape of Carrigtwohill for the past 15 years and a danger to kids who used it as a playground. It was a miracle no one was injured.” 

Mr Barry said it was clear that there was not a demand for apartment blocks in the East Cork town.

“The development changed hands a few times, but they couldn’t sell the apartments on the private market. They were not the easiest to shift, they were hard to sell and the State was the only purchaser in the end.” 

More in this section

Sponsored Content

summersoaplogosml

Called Droid, our next story is about a boy who designs a robot at UCC and chaos ensues. It was written by Margaret Gillies, from the MA in Creative Writing Programme at UCC.

Add Echolive.ie to your home screen - easy access to Cork news, views, sport and more