Cork city walk and cycleway gets a €900k upgrade

The upgraded walk and cycleway has been officially opened by the Lord Mayor of Cork, Cllr Colm Kelleher.
Cork city walk and cycleway gets a €900k upgrade

Enjoying a walk on the Curraheen Walk and Cycleway are (L to R) Jack O'Leary, Cork City Council Infrastructure Directorate, Edith Roberts, Cork City Council Infrastructure Directorate, Dan Murphy, McGinty & O'Shea, Lord Mayor of Cork Cllr Colm Kelleher, Jerome McCarthy, Cork City Council Infrastructure Directorate.

Major upgrade works at a cost of €900,000 have been carried out at a popular spot for walkers, joggers and cyclists in the city.

The Carrigrohane to Curraheen Walk and Cycleway Upgrade Project, fully funded by the National Transport Authority (NTA), was undertaken to improve the safety and comfort of the walkway, to encourage sustainable transport, and increase commuter usage along the 4.4km route, running alongside the course of the Twopot and Curraheen Rivers in Bishopstown. 

Key elements of the upgrade works, carried out by contractor McGinty & O’Shea, include the removal of the ‘kissing gate’ on the bridge towards the Carrigrohane end of the route, which had previously been an obstruction for cyclists; the installation of energy-efficient LED public lighting along the full route; the repair of damaged surfacing and overlay of much the surface between Model Farm Road and Carrigrohane Road; the realignment and provision of paving and lighting on the link between the walkway and the IDA Park on Model Farm Road and the installation of cycle repair stations near entrances to IDA and MTU.

 Lord Mayor Cllr Colm Kelleher and one of the cycle repair stations on the route.
Lord Mayor Cllr Colm Kelleher and one of the cycle repair stations on the route.

The upgraded Curraheen Walk and Cycleway was officially opened by the Lord Mayor of Cork, Cllr Colm Kelleher.

"Not only does this walk and cycleway provide an important sustainable transport corridor for our city, it's also of huge benefit to getting people out and about, an attractive location for people of all ages to get out for a leisurely stroll or a cycle in comfortable and beautiful surroundings," he said.

Through community engagement, Cork City Council facilitated the establishment of the Bishopstown Otter Trail by the Cork Nature Network – a sequence of four information signs being installed between Murphy’s Farm and Rossbrook Estate on Model Farm Road.

Also, in conjunction with Bishopstown Tidy Towns and their consulting ecologist, some fallen trees creating obstructions to the flow of the Curraheen River were removed.

Others were retained to maintain river crossing points for wildlife, maintain in-river habitats, help with flood attenuation, and protect against new riverbank erosion.

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