Cork-based asylum seeker's hunger strike for permission to remain reaches seventh day

Cork-based asylum seeker's hunger strike for permission to remain reaches seventh day

34-year-old man Nadim Hussain has now entered day seven of his hunger strike at the Kinsale road direct provision centre.

An Indian asylum seeker living in a direct provision centre in Cork city has said that he is feeling ill as he continues his hunger strike campaign to achieve permission to remain status in Ireland.

34-year-old man Nadim Hussain has entered day seven of his hunger strike at the Kinsale road direct provision centre, where he has lived since coming to Ireland in 2019 after both of his parents were killed in anti-Muslim violence.

Last month, he received a letter from the International Protection Appeal Tribunal (IPAT) which affirmed a recommendation of the international protection officer which stated that he should be refused a declaration as a refugee along with subsidiary protection status.

Following on from the letter, he is pleading to be granted leave to remain in Ireland as he fears for his life if he was to be deported back to his home country.

Mr Hussain said he is still awaiting a decision in regard to permission to remain in the country.

34-year-old man Nadim Hussain has now entered day seven of his hunger strike at the Kinsale road direct provision centre.
34-year-old man Nadim Hussain has now entered day seven of his hunger strike at the Kinsale road direct provision centre.

Speaking to The Echo on day seven of his hunger strike, he said that he is in pain and has been vomiting regularly throughout the day.

He said that he will most likely need to receive medical attention on Thursday.

Mr Hussain said he is now begging the Minister of Justice Heather Humphreys to intervene in his case.

Speaking this week in the Dáil on Mr Hussain’s case, TD Mick Barry called on the Minister of State with Responsibility of Law Reform James Browne to speak to Mr Hussain to have a senior official from the Department speak to him.

The Solidarity TD said: “Nadim worked all the way through the pandemic, he worked in a hospital, as a security worker he paid his taxes.

“Last month, Nadim received a letter from the International Protection Appeal Tribunal (IPAT) which affirmed a recommendation of the International Protection Officer which stated that he should be refused the declaration as a refugee along with subsidiary protection status.

Nadim had provided certificates from his family’s doctor concerning the death of his parents along with a multiplicity of other documentation.

“Part of the problem here though is that Nadim has been unable to provide written documentation from the police outlining the details of the death of his parents, but anyone familiar with the question of anti-Muslim violence in India these days and the toll of the State under the Modi government will not be surprised by this, wouldn’t expect someone to get certificates of that kind from the police.

“Someone who was knowledgeable of the situation, I think, would say that Nadim is being asked to clear an impossible huddle.” 

Responding to Deputy Barry’s question, Minister Browne said that while he cannot comment on individual cases, he can assure that “each application for international protection is examined in detail on its individual merits, taking all factors into account”.

“The permission to remain process consists of a full consideration of their private and family rights in accordance with the European Convention on Human Rights as well as consideration of their work situation among other issues.

My objective is to have decisions made on international protection applications and permission to remain considerations as soon as possible. This ensures that those who are found to be in need of our protection can receive it quickly and begin rebuilding their lives here with a sense of safety and security.

“For those found not to be in need of international protection, a full consideration of all aspects of the case under the process I’ve outlined is considered before any deportation order is made.

"I can also assure the Deputy that a negative decision on an appeal by the independent International Protection Appeal Tribunal is not the final stage in the international protection process. In these circumstances, an applicant will have their permission to remain consideration reviewed by the International Protection Office.

“This represents a fifth opportunity for the applicant to go forward with their case to be allowed to remain in the State having already been considered for a grant of refugee status, subsidiary protection, permission to remain and the appeal to the IPAT,” he said.

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