'Visually obtrusive and overbearing': Plans for apartment block on Cork’s northside refused permission 

'Visually obtrusive and overbearing': Plans for apartment block on Cork’s northside refused permission 

The three-storey development would have contained eight units: Four one-beds, three two-beds, and one three-bed.

A PROPOSED apartment block for the northside of the city has been refused planning permission by Cork City Council. It was deemed that the development would be “overly dominant on the skyline”.

In June, applicants sought planning for the development, at No 1 Ard Na Laoi, Middle Glanmire Road, in Montenotte.

The three-storey development would have contained eight units: Four one-beds, three two-beds, and one three-bed.

Pedestrian access would have been via a new opening within the existing stone-faced wall to Middle Glanmire Road and via a new opening within the existing stone-faced wall to the Ard Na Laoi estate road.

Vehicular access was proposed via a new opening to the existing stone-faced wall to the Ard Na Laoi estate road.

The proposed development also included four on-site car-parking spaces, and bicycle parking.

Reasons for decision 

In making the decision, planners at Cork City Council said the height, nature, scale, and siting of the proposed, three-storey development, at an elevated site above the Middle Glanmire Road, “is considered to be a significant and detrimental impact upon the Montenotte/Tivoli Ridge”.

Planners said that, if permitted, the development would be “overly dominant on the skyline”.

It was also noted that the proposed development would constitute an 'excessive density and inappropriate scale and urban form of development'. 

Council planners said: 

“The proposed development would represent overdevelopment of the site and would seriously injure the amenities of the area and of property in the vicinity.”

It was deemed that the proposed development would be “visually obtrusive and overbearing”.

Based on the submitted documentation with the planning application, planners also said that it was not demonstrated that the proposed development would have “sufficient, usable, and quality communal open space that is accessible and secure” and would, therefore, be contrary to planning criteria.

Concerns were also expressed about the proposed vehicular entrance potentially presenting a risk to pedestrian and vehicular safety.

It was also noted that the site of the proposed development forms part of lands that have a “designation of tree preservation order (TPO)” and, from the documents submitted with the planning application, it was not demonstrated that the proposed development would not have a detrimental impact on the mature and semi-mature trees within the site boundaries.

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