Cork man completes gruelling fundraiser for Cancer Connect and local rowing club

Cork man completes gruelling fundraiser for Cancer Connect and local rowing club

Paul Deasy recently completed 1,000 kilometres on a rowing machine during the month of May to raise money for Cancer Connect and Galley Flash Rowing Club.

A West Cork man recently completed 1,000 kilometres on a rowing machine during the month of May to raise money for Cancer Connect and Galley Flash Rowing Club.

The gruelling rowing fundraiser took Clonakilty man Paul Deasy a total of 93.5 hours to complete. He was delighted to complete his fundraising task. 

“I rowed 1,000 kilometres which is a million metres on a rowing machine during May. 

"It took 93.5 hours in total. You get a cert when you get past this target. It is a great cause, but it was great to finish it."

"I always wanted to do something and I finally got the opportunity this year,” he said.

Paul Deasy recently completed 1,000 kilometres on a rowing machine during the month of May to raise money for Cancer Connect and Galley Flash Rowing Club.
Paul Deasy recently completed 1,000 kilometres on a rowing machine during the month of May to raise money for Cancer Connect and Galley Flash Rowing Club.

The 34-year-old is a keen rowing enthusiast. He has rowed with Galley Flash RC who are based in Ardfield/Rathbarry over the last 15 years. 

His fundraising venture has raised over €4,300 to date. He is thrilled to raise vital funds for two very important organisations. 

“I will divide this figure up between the two organisations. The rowing club has lost out on a number of fundraising events since the pandemic, while every family has suffered from cancer. Cancer Connect doesn't get any government funding.” 

Mr Deasy who lives in Gaggin said he tried to complete 50 kilometres on the rowing machine on a daily basis. 

“I took the first two weeks off work in May. My aim was to get a big chunk completed by that time. During that fortnight I got around 700 kilometres completed. I was doing 50 kilometres most days. I broke it into 5k segments and did it at various times every day.

“It was a daunting challenge and it was mentally challenging. After the first few days, I was feeling nauseous, but gradually my body got used to it. 

"Boat training resumed recently. I will let the body recover, but I will be back rowing in the water again very soon,” he added.

More in this section

Sponsored Content

summersoaplogosml

Called Droid, our next story is about a boy who designs a robot at UCC and chaos ensues. It was written by Margaret Gillies, from the MA in Creative Writing Programme at UCC.

Add Echolive.ie to your home screen - easy access to Cork news, views, sport and more