City Hall bin police: Thirty-six households in Cork under investigation for illegal dumping 

City Hall bin police: Thirty-six households in Cork under investigation for illegal dumping 

Households are under investigation for illegal dumping under strict bylaws introduced in March.

THIRTY-six city households are under investigation for illegal dumping under strict bylaws introduced in March.

All the homes being investigated by Cork City Council are situated on the northside of the city. Seven of the homes are in Killala Gardens in Knocknaheeny and 10 are in Glenamoy Lawn in Mayfield.

Nine of the homes are in Sunday School Lane and 10 are in Orchard Court - both in Blackpool.

No figures have been made available on fines issued and paid in these areas.

The regulations have seen strict enforcement on waste storage and bin presentation outside homes, while households now have to prove how they dispose of their waste or face fixed fines and possible prosecution.

Councillor Joe Kavanagh asked Cork City Council to reveal how many homes have been inspected and warned that fines must be enforced on homes that do not comply with waste regulations.

City Hall director of operations Valerie O’Sullivan said door-to-door checks being carried out by council staff in areas where dumping has been raised as a recurring issue led to a reduction in illegal fly-tipping.

“Following on from the introduction of the new waste presentation bye-laws, Cork City Council’s environment section identified a number of locations, which were highlighted through illegal dumping and customer complaints, in which door-to-door refuse service checks were carried out,” said Ms O’Sullivan.

“Letters were sent to the residents at these locations and staff from both the Environment Department and Housing Department conducted door-to-door inspections at properties which did not respond to the initial correspondence.

“As engagement with the residents of these areas took place over a phased period each area is at a different stage of the process.

“Overall the response from the resident has been positive. A small number of residents in the areas are still under investigation in relation to compliance with the waste presentation bye-laws and a number of investigations have resulted in fixed payment notices being issued.

“The feedback from residents, elected members and housing officers in the areas is that these investigations have resulted in a reduction in the amount of illegally dumped waste in the areas and given the success of these door-to-door service checks it is envisaged that further checks will be carried out across the city.

“There are also ongoing inspections being carried out on an individual basis where issues relating to illegal dumping are highlighted,” Ms O’Sullivan added.

It is hoped the new bylaws will be instrumental in tackling an increase in dumping across the city.

If the householder uses a civic amenity site, they now need to keep receipts for at least a year to prove this or face fines of up to €2,500, while fixed penalties of €75 will be issued to households that are without waste removal contracts or do not have documentation to prove of lawful disposal.

Under the bylaws, bin containers must be stored on the owner’s property, must not be overloaded, and must have their lids securely closed.

Most householders are also not allowed to put out their waste any earlier than 6pm the day before collection and bins have to be taken back on to private property no later than 7pm on the day of collection.

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