Cork greenway project going at ‘snail's pace’

Cork greenway project going at ‘snail's pace’
Greenway between Carrigaline and Crosshaven.Picture Denis Minihane.

THE National Transport Authority (NTA) is being urged to immediately address the “snail’s pace” progression of a greenway in the heart of Cork’s commuter belt.

The new programme for government promises major investment in greenways across the country but some existing plans have stalled in recent times.

The proposed Glenbrook to Carrigaline/Ringaskiddy Greenway has failed to move forward over the last year.

Passage West councillor Marcia D’Alton said she has consistently had the project on the council agenda since last July and was told the tender documents would be done by the end of summer 2019.

“Now we are being told with a bit of luck we will have the tender documents by quarter three, 2020. I just don’t think we are acting fast enough,” said Ms D’Alton.

Fianna Fáil’s Seamus McGrath suggested the project should be split into sections with pieces delivered as soon as possible.

Ms D’Alton said it was extremely disheartening to see the slow progress of the project.

“It’s an overwhelming level of frustration at what seems to be the immobility of the system in relation to the urgency of these things. 

"How in God’s name can we get that urgency into the preparation of tender documents, the tendering, the appointment of the consultants, moving on and getting some excitement going? How do we get that in relation to something ongoing in 2015?”

Mr McGrath said the project has a long history at this stage.

“Planning was approved then the NTA changed their mind based on issues many of us had flagged long in advance of the planning application.

“Now funding has been allocated for consultants again, but it is snail’s pace.

“We need to start looking at picking off sections that can be delivered, because if you wait for everything to come together you are going to be in a difficult situation with delays.”

The Carrigaline Municipal District agreed to write to the NTA asking them to pick off the most dangerous stretches and look at how they can be progressed individually.

More in this section

Sponsored Content