VIDEO: Anyone for coffee and handstands?

For one Wilton-based exercise centre and class space, Saturday mornings mean one thing: members get together for a cup of coffee before learning how to do a handstand. MIKE MCGRATH-BRYAN went along to find out more
VIDEO: Anyone for coffee and handstands?
Robbie O'Driscoll, co-owner, demonstrating a handstand during the class at Cafe Move. Picture Denis Minihane.Video with this.

IT’S 9am on a fresh Saturday morning at Doughcloyne Industrial Estate, just up Sarsfield Road. And nestled among the warehouses, retail units and even a children’s amusement complex, lies an exercise and fitness centre unlike any other.

Café Move is being opened as we come in the door, and at first glance, as wooden pallets create a small corridor to a fully-stocked coffee bar that’s being readied for the day, slinging out tea and speciality coffees as well as protein supplements, the idea sets in.

Opened three years ago by owner-operators Robbie O’Driscoll and Karen Lunnon, Café Move styles itself not necessarily as a gym, but as a ‘movement centre’, prioritising exercise and wellbeing in comparatively unorthodox ways, especially for the current climate.

Weight equipment is noticeable by its absence, and brass rings for gymnastics and acrobatic use hang from the rafters on both floors. The whole air of the place seems to be the polar opposite of the iron temples that seem to be springing up all over the city as of late.

At the forefront of the centre’s drive for accessibility is a simple yet starkly ‘different’ idea: a class simply entitled ‘Coffee and Handstands’. Doing largely what it says on the tin, the class allows for participants to file in early for a cuppa and some chats with the facility’s staff and fellow exercisers for about an hour, before getting down to the brass tacks of stretches, collaborative warm-ups and exercises combining gymnastics with resistance training.

For Robbie it’s about bringing a lifetime of movement and fitness experience to a welcoming, inclusive space.

Robbie O'Driscoll, co-owner, (right) supervising as Terry Curtin (left) and Iarom Madden assisted with a handstand for Martha Lynch, at Cafe Move.Picture Denis Minihane.Video with this.
Robbie O'Driscoll, co-owner, (right) supervising as Terry Curtin (left) and Iarom Madden assisted with a handstand for Martha Lynch, at Cafe Move.Picture Denis Minihane.Video with this.

“The whole concept comes from the point that exercise and socialising ought to be brought together, for the full package of developing a person,” he said.

“There has to be a bit of craic, in regards to exercise. It needs to be a constant, week in, week out, and if you’re doing it by yourself all the time, it’s going to suck. But if you’re in the company of good people, and the theme of the class is that it’s playful on the weekend...

“I think it ticks all the boxes regarding staying social, staying healthy, staying strong. And it’s a draw to have that chance to being people together, to have the chats, a bit of interaction and discourse before we get things moving.”

So how does one teach somebody a handstand? Even the mention of the word likely conjures up one’s own childhood images of small gymnastic feats among friends while out playing, gangly legs kicking up awkwardly into wobbly displays of athleticism.

The process of reverting to that mindset, and tapping into exercisers’ inner children, is what sets the class apart from any other offering in Cork gyms at present. And it’s making a difference, says O’Driscoll.

“In this environment, there will be a general warm-up, so everyone can benefit from strengthening and mobilising the fingers, wrists, hands, shoulders, and core. So, nothing is outside the capacity of anybody.

Phelim Mannion, who works in Café Move, after making a cappuccino.Picture Denis Minihane.Video with this.
Phelim Mannion, who works in Café Move, after making a cappuccino.Picture Denis Minihane.Video with this.

“Anybody can join the class, we have an age bracket here from early 20s up to 60. And as the class progresses, we split into groups, who is able for what, and then there’s individual practice. And it’s taught in a way that involves a partner or a group, so that everyone achieves their handstand, achieves their goal. You have that sense of camaraderie, it has that playfulness to it...

“There’s one person that sticks in mind to me, Martha, she showed up here a year-and-a-half ago with a shoulder injury, she was an avid taekwondo player. She turned 60 recently and is now kicking up into a handstand. Coming from a place of no gymnastics training, arriving with an injury and developing that practice is something.”

The centre’s regular custom has been slowly increasing in number over the past three years, as its reputation has spread among people looking for something different from a fitness experience. But even for such an eclectic group of people, this morning ranging from athletes to former quantum physicists, the idea of building from absolute zero to a handstand might be strange for different reasons. The idea, however, has been received well, according to Robbie, acting for some as a goal, and for others as a gateway to more movement.

Robbie O'Driscoll, co-owner, (centre right) and the class participants during an exercise as partner assisted shoulder mobility developing circles.Picture Denis Minihane.Video with this.
Robbie O'Driscoll, co-owner, (centre right) and the class participants during an exercise as partner assisted shoulder mobility developing circles.Picture Denis Minihane.Video with this.

“Let’s say somebody hasn’t been referred to us, they see a post (online). ‘Coffee and handstands, what’s that about?’. So, they’re quite apprehensive, they’re expecting something a bit hipster-y... But we meet them on a one-to-one level.

“People who have been recommended to us are all quite enthusiastic about arriving, they’ve heard great things on us. People outside the centre, in (the fitness space in the city) look upon us as being quite airy-fairy, that’s one term we hear a lot. Maybe they’re the regular gym-goer and they see us with coffee and hanging upside-down, and it seems like an airy-fairy approach, not understanding that when we get into it, there’s some serious training, there’s a lot of sports-science, exercise-science, and I’ve travelled the world collecting these exercises to bring them to a public domain.”

Robbie is emphatic about creating an inclusive space.

“When we first opened, one of the first installments was a café, put right in the centre, creating a social atmosphere for a physical lifestyle and culture was the idea. Not to say you’re a gym-goer, but that it’s more a lifestyle, you meet people you already know, like the ‘Cheers’ of the gym world. There’s no obligation to exercise in one format here, no dogmatic view. I teach the content I teach, I keep it as broad as I can, without restrictions on the members to not explore their own approach.

“We shake hands and meet each other, and that was the idea. In this setting, also, it’s more attractive to those who aren’t drawn into the gym scene. I wanted to offer an alternative.

Enjoying a cuppa before the class at Cafe Move, were (from left) Terry Curtin, Martha Lynch, Shakira Coonghe, Ellen O'Mahony and Karen Lunnon, a co-owner. Picture Denis Minihane.Video with this.
Enjoying a cuppa before the class at Cafe Move, were (from left) Terry Curtin, Martha Lynch, Shakira Coonghe, Ellen O'Mahony and Karen Lunnon, a co-owner. Picture Denis Minihane.Video with this.

“We don’t offer fat loss, and we accept anybody in whatever way they show up. We’re more interested in physical ability and whatever that is to the individual. Wherever they’re coming from, wherever they’d like to go, we’d like to be part of the assistance, and offer an environment where they’re not under pressure to adhere to a particular aesthetic, because that’s absurd to me. I believe weight loss, etc. is a by-product of tweaking of one’s lifestyle to improve their physical ability and their quality of life. Nor is it driven by what they ‘ought to’, or ‘should’.

“Because those negative motivations burn out quite quickly, I’d prefer it to be something that gives them an improved experience of life. ‘Now I can go hillwalking, now I can play with my kids, now I can have fun with my own body’. Whatever that is to them, I’d like to be part of. And that perpetuates itself, being around others, without the sense of judgement.”

Robbie O'Driscoll and Karen Lunnon, co-owners.Picture Denis Minihane.Video with this.
Robbie O'Driscoll and Karen Lunnon, co-owners.Picture Denis Minihane.Video with this.

As the interview progresses, our seat at the space’s coffee bar allows us the opportunity to meet the attendees. Martha Lynch, who Robbie referred to eaerlier, is softly-spoken, but effusive in her praise for the facility and what it’s done for her wellbeing. After demonstrating a handstand technique hard-won by training and exercise, she’s quick to reiterate.

Martha Lynch enjoying the class. Picture Denis Minihane.Video with this.
Martha Lynch enjoying the class. Picture Denis Minihane.Video with this.

“It’s improved my fitness, my core, my balance, strength… everything. My energy… it’s great fun. We end up laughing halfway through the class most of the time, and it’s just great fun, and the coffee’s brilliant (laughs).

“It doesn’t matter what level you’re at, Robbie adjusts everything so you can participate in class and do your bit. I’m trying now to learn to do a pull-up, haven’t gotten near it but there’s variations all the way up, and it’s just getting your bit and working your way up. No machines, and you’re talking to people all the time.”

Coffee and Handstands’ runs Saturdays, 9am to midday at Café Move, Unit 3, Doughcloyne Industrial Estate, Sarsfield Road, Wilton.

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