Pictures: EDelia celebrates its 32 newly qualified coaches in Blackrock

Blackrock Castle is the backdrop for graduation ceremony
Pictures: EDelia celebrates its 32 newly qualified coaches in Blackrock

Ruairi O'Ceilleachair, CEO EDelia, Professor Dolina Dowling, Patrick Meehan, President EMCC Ireland and Shelley Crawford, Lecturer & EMCC Master Coach Practitioner. Picture: Jim Coughlan.

Cork-based EDelia Group has held its first-ever graduation ceremony of education-based practitioner-level coaches at Blackrock Castle.

A total of 32 people graduated, some in absentia, from Ireland, South Africa, France, Germany, and Barbados after completing the course which was delivered online.

Present on the day was CEO EDelia Ruairí Ó Ceilleachair, Glasgow University Professor Dolina Dowling, EMCC Master Coach Practitioner Shelley Crawford, and President EMCC Ireland Patrick Meehan.

 Roisin Carty and Marie O'Connell. Picture: Jim Coughlan.
Roisin Carty and Marie O'Connell. Picture: Jim Coughlan.

Speaking to The Echo, Mr O’Ceilleachair said that they had “the perfect day” for the graduation which he said was made extra special with the backdrop of Blackrock Castle and a string quartet from Cork School of Music.

 Hannah Fortune with her mum, Maureen McAdam. Picture: Jim Coughlan.
Hannah Fortune with her mum, Maureen McAdam. Picture: Jim Coughlan.

Mr Ó Ceilleachair founded EDelia — the name of which is a tribute to his own parents whose names are Edward and Delia — in 2015. He said that the business “fell off a cliff” when Covid-19 hit but that when he took the business online he had a global business and is now working to attract more coaches from other countries.

 Lorraine Galvin and Peter Fitton. Picture: Jim Coughlan.
Lorraine Galvin and Peter Fitton. Picture: Jim Coughlan.

Speaking about the graduates, he said that they are now equipped with a globally recognised accreditation in coaching and this EMCC accreditation allows them to set up their own practice, but also to use the skill set in their professional lives as teachers, healthcare professionals, managers, or executives.

“Awareness of the value of a coaching approach is growing globally and EDelia is finding the demand for coaching courses is increasing.

 Mark O'Driscoll with his wife Clair O'Driscoll.  Picture: Jim Coughlan.
Mark O'Driscoll with his wife Clair O'Driscoll.  Picture: Jim Coughlan.

“People are finding more and more that the levels of stress that we’re witnessing amongst managers, students, teachers, healthcare professionals, really have gone up and Covid hadn’t helped,” he said. “What a coach will allow people to do is to notice where a persons’ attention is.

 Sharon O'Connell with her sister, Louise O'Callaghan.Picture: Jim Coughlan.
Sharon O'Connell with her sister, Louise O'Callaghan.Picture: Jim Coughlan.

“When our attention is on things that we can’t control we get anxious and when we can notice where our attention is and put it on something that is useful, and over which we have control, it tends to reduce the anxiety dramatically.

 Eoghan, Dermot, Kay and Eimera Carew. Picture: Jim Coughlan.
Eoghan, Dermot, Kay and Eimera Carew. Picture: Jim Coughlan.

“Some people won’t go to counselling because it’s seen as a deficit model, but coaching is about ‘Where am I now? Where do I want to go? And, what are my options to get from one place to the other?’

He added: “Most people, when they get clear about what they want, can usually figure out how to get there themselves.

 Delphine O'Brien, Eithne Sheehan and Karyn Leech.Picture: Jim Coughlan.
Delphine O'Brien, Eithne Sheehan and Karyn Leech.Picture: Jim Coughlan.

“We seem to love problems, whereas when you ask people to focus on what they want to happen it’s very often followed by silence because they haven’t given it thought because they’re so focused on what they don’t want.

 Deirdre Bevan. Picture: Jim Coughlan.
Deirdre Bevan. Picture: Jim Coughlan.

“And coaching helps to reframe and helps to get clarity on what they actually want and to do that you created a psychologically safe space to allow people to speak out loud without feeling judged and that’s essentially what they do for people,” Mr Ó Ceilleachair said.

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