Planning application lodged for major CUH extension

If approved, the development would consist of a five story extension to the hospital’s paediatric department, creating 83 new inpatient rooms
Planning application lodged for major CUH extension

New paediatric high dependency units, palliative care suites, haemotology bed spaces, procedure rooms, operating theatres and diagnostic facilities would also be created. Picture: Dan Linehan

A planning application seeking to build a major extension to Cork University Hospital’s paediatric department has been lodged with Cork City Council.

If approved, the development would consist of a five-storey extension to the hospital’s existing children’s unit, creating 83 new inpatient rooms.

New high dependency units, palliative care suites, haemotology bed spaces, procedure rooms, operating theatres and diagnostic facilities would also be created.

The application, which was received late last month, was lodged by the HSE South.

“The development will contain ancillary healthcare staff facilities, plant and storage for the operation of the unit,” a description of the proposed development reads.

“The development will also provide for the refurbishment of level one of the existing paediatric unit to accommodate allied health professional services and a paediatric assessment unit.” 

Plans for a major overhaul of the department, which was built in 1978, were revealed towards the end of 2020.

Phase one saw the installation of dedicated paediatric outpatient accommodation in the hospital, while 74 replacement beds, four high dependency units, three paediatric operating theatres and a dedicated paediatric procedure room were originally planned for the next two phases.

The HSE’s national director for capital and estates, Jim Curran, told Cork North Central Sinn Féin TD Thomas Gould that he expects phases two and three to cost around €75m to €85m.

Speaking to the  The Echo recently, Cork GP Dr Paul O’Sullivan described the proposed development as a “shot in the arm” for paediatrics in the Munster region.

“GPs would have close contact with paeds colleagues and are aware of how stretched and under pressure the service is,” he said.

“This development would have been a shot in the arm for paediatrics in the wider Munster region, and would have offered a quantum leap in the range of services that can be offered, saving children from having to go to Dublin to be treated.” 

A decision on the application is due February 21.

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