Cork local authorities to communicate about Lee to Sea greenway

At the Carrigaline Municipal District, one councillor said he understood a feasibility study had been agreed by Cork City Council in relation to the Lee to Sea project and said that Cork County Council was in charge of half of the journey to the sea.
Cork local authorities to communicate about Lee to Sea greenway

The Owenabue River at Drake's Pool and the walkway/cycle path Greenway on the old railway line to Crosshaven, Co Cork. Pic; Larry Cummins

COMMUNICATION between the two local authorities in relation to the Lee to Sea greenway is to be instigated by Cork County Council.

Michael Paul Murtagh, Crosshaven Fine Gael councillor, raised the issue of the two greenway projects ongoing within the two districts, which link up to create the Lee to Sea public vision endorsed and campaigned by Cork Cycling Campaign.

At the Carrigaline Municipal District, the Fine Gael councillor said he understood a feasibility study had been agreed by Cork City Council in relation to the Lee to Sea project and said that Cork County Council was in charge of half of the journey to the sea.

Mr Murtagh said communication should be instigated with Cork City Council as to their plans for the greenway and blueway combined, to link up with their plans and continue the project from their side.

Cork County Council senior executive officer, Nicola Radley, said the idea was put to the Strategic Policy Committee to assess the level of priority the project would be given, something that was questioned by councillors.

Marcia D’Alton, Passage West Independent councillor, outlined the crux of the issue.

“It is called ‘Lee to Sea’ and it was spurred by the public,” Ms D’Alton said. 

“We have been calling it the Cork Harbour Greenway: It is the same thing, it doesn’t really matter, but it would be lovely to have collaboration or conversation or a link between the two authorities, if for no other reason than signage could be cohesive.”

Mrs D’Alton said it was important to set up a collaboration between the two local authorities.

“It doesn’t mean we have to copy them or do what they are doing, it’s just so that we are all talking and aware of what the other is doing.” Mr Murtagh agreed that, for a tourist trail, “a bit of consistency from start to finish would be great”.

Ms Radley said she was under the impression that Cork County Council had reached out to the city previously on this issue and said she would look into the history of the communication between the two authorities in relation to the Lee to Sea project.

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