Mural project that has brightened Cork city spaces completes its second year

Over 140lt of paint, tinted in more than 22 colours, was used for the mural, which was sponsored by Pat McDonnell Paints.
Mural project that has brightened Cork city spaces completes its second year

The final mural, created by Cork-born artist Conor Harrington, was unveiled this week near Bishop Lucey Park. Picture: John Beasley

THE Ardú Street Art Project has wrapped up its second year, after completing four large-scale murals around parts of Cork City over the past number of weeks.

The final mural, created by Cork-born artist Conor Harrington, was unveiled this week near Bishop Lucey Park.

Mr Harrington, who now lives in London, said that he took inspiration from the English Market for his first Leeside mural.

“My favourite part of Cork is the English Market,” he said. “I used to do as much of my shopping as possible there when I lived in Tower St, and every time I’m home, I’m always sure to have a stroll through and soak up some of the atmosphere.

“In my painting, a man sets a table — a composition of fruit and veg in the manner of a lot of still-life paintings from the 18th Century, when the English Market and much of the Grand Parade and Patrick’s Street was built.

Renowned Cork-born London-based artist Conor Harrington putting the finishing touches on his new giant mural at Bishop Lucey Park, Cork City, as part of Ardú Street Art Project 2021. "I’ve used the English Market as a starting point for my mural, the gate of which is opposite my wall. It was built in 1788 and has seen us through famine, boom and bust. In my painting, a man sets a table, a composition of fruit and veg in the manner of a lot of still life paintings from the 18th Century, when the English market and much of the Grand Parade and Patrick’s Street was built. The table is overflowing with fruit, an abundance of fresh produce that has been available in the market for years. I’ve included a doll’s house on the table to illustrate how Cork is a city built on food and how our culinary scene is one of our greatest assets. I’ve also included a fire extinguisher on the table as a reminder of the Burning of Cork 101 years ago, and that although the market was mostly spared, damage was still done." For more see Ardú's Twitter/Instagram @ArduStreetArt Photo by John Beasley
Renowned Cork-born London-based artist Conor Harrington putting the finishing touches on his new giant mural at Bishop Lucey Park, Cork City, as part of Ardú Street Art Project 2021. "I’ve used the English Market as a starting point for my mural, the gate of which is opposite my wall. It was built in 1788 and has seen us through famine, boom and bust. In my painting, a man sets a table, a composition of fruit and veg in the manner of a lot of still life paintings from the 18th Century, when the English market and much of the Grand Parade and Patrick’s Street was built. The table is overflowing with fruit, an abundance of fresh produce that has been available in the market for years. I’ve included a doll’s house on the table to illustrate how Cork is a city built on food and how our culinary scene is one of our greatest assets. I’ve also included a fire extinguisher on the table as a reminder of the Burning of Cork 101 years ago, and that although the market was mostly spared, damage was still done." For more see Ardú's Twitter/Instagram @ArduStreetArt Photo by John Beasley

“The table is overflowing with fruit, an abundance of fresh produce that has been available in the market for years.”

Harrington also included a doll’s house in the painting to illustrate the importance of Cork’s culinary scene, as well as a fire extinguisher to act as a reminder of the 1920 Burning of Cork.

Over 140lt of paint, tinted in more than 22 colours, was used for the mural, which was sponsored by Pat McDonnell Paints.

The work joins Shane O’Malley’s painting on Lower Glanmire Rd, Friz’s Goddess Cliodhna on St Finbarr’s Road and What is home? by Asbestos at South Main St.

Organisers of the initiative, which started after the pandemic struck, say it aims at “injecting a burst of colour, vibrancy, and life into the city in lockdown”. They have recently opened a donation page online to fund the project.

Team Ardú L-R Clare Keogh, Peter Martin, Louise Barker, Rose-Anne Kidney, Paul Gleeson, Shane O'Driscoll
Team Ardú L-R Clare Keogh, Peter Martin, Louise Barker, Rose-Anne Kidney, Paul Gleeson, Shane O'Driscoll

Those who donate will be automatically entered into a raffle to win a signed print of artwork featured in last year’s series, which was created by Maser, Peter Martin, Shane O’Driscoll, Deirdre Breen, Garreth Joyce, Aches and James Earley.

To donate, or take an audio tour of the works, see arducork.ie.

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