Cork's coffee characters - Meet the souls behind your coffee strolls

Cork's coffee characters - Meet the souls behind your coffee strolls

TWO brothers have spread their entrepreneurial wings and set up a coffee van at the end of Mardyke Walk, on the grounds of the Sacred Heart Catholic church car park.

FROM brothers to cousins and couples to father-daughter dynamics, it seems coffee in Cork is becoming a family affair and with the fine weather getting finer, The Echo checked in with some of the people behind Cork's coffee stroll culture, providing caffeine kicks and sweet treats.

First up is Coffee Brothers.

TWO brothers have spread their entrepreneurial wings and set up a coffee van at the end of Mardyke Walk, on the grounds of the Sacred Heart Catholic church car park.

Adrian Twomey, who was an electrician until he turned his hand to setting up a coffee van along with his brother Seán J, bought a renovated trailer in 2019, before the pandemic.

Joking about the recent influx of coffee containers, Adrian said: “Now everyone and their mam wants a trailer.” 

The brothers, who are from Mourneabbey, North Cork, are of farming stock and like to sort things themselves, or at least try. 

“We wanted it to look as close to a cute trendy cafe while being a trailer. We went with the vintage look.” 

They converted the trailer themselves to suit their tastes, using stained pallet wood and reclaimed rope from the sea to kit out the inside.

While Adrian is the driving force, Seán J helps out, but is mostly a silent partner.

The van, emblazoned with the logo ‘Coffee Brothers’, sells fair trade Bewley’s Coffee and homemade goods from Ellen’s Kitchen. 

They also sell cookies baked in Limerick by Sarah O’Sullivan.

“We were doing things part-time up to November, 2020, mostly weddings and corporate events as well as popping up at the Five Foot Way in Cobh.” 

Then the boys approached the Sacred Heart, who were open-minded to the idea of having a coffee van at the end of the car park.

“We also approached AIB but there would have been a lot of red tape,” Adrian said.

The arrangement worked out to be mutually beneficial to the church, with the boys making a contribution to charity and the priests also enjoy the odd free coffee.

“We get all kinds of people coming to us,” said Adrian. 

“Parents, people working from home, a lot of regulars, students, people going to the park with a kid, commuters.” 

He said the pair are hoping to keep the coffee company going long after the pandemic. “I don’t see any reason to give it up. Most people are glad to see it. I would like to think we made an impact and people will support us after Covid.

“We are a local, family-run, convenient hub, our cups are compostable and our coffee is fair trade.

“We are here six days a week from 9am to 6pm, Tuesday to Friday, and 10am to 6pm at the weekends.”

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