Councillors vote to rename city street to honour Cork family

Councillors vote to rename city street to honour Cork family

CORK city councillors have unanimously voted to rename Anglesea Street to honour a well-known Cork family. Picture: Denis Scannell

CORK city councillors have unanimously voted to rename Anglesea Street to honour a well-known Cork family.

At this evening's full council meeting, councillors signalled their intention to move forward with the process of renaming Anglesea Street.

The street, which is home to a Garda Station, a courthouse, Cork City Fire Brigade’s headquarters, and the main entrance to Cork City Hall, now looks set to become MacSwiney Street.

Proposals to rename the busy thoroughfare date back to 2019.

Sinn Féin councillors Kenneth Collins and Henry Cremin proposed that the local authority would examine the possibility of renaming the street to honour former Lord Mayor Terence MacSwiney.

Following discussions at committee meetings since, the renaming of Anglesea Street is intended to honour the MacSwiney family as a whole.

Honouring the MacSwiney family 

Speaking at the full council meeting, Independent councillor and historian Kieran McCarthy said it would be important that the public is informed about this distinction.

“I would like that the paperwork that’s sent out to the public on this once it’s sanctioned here this evening will allude to the fact that this is about the MacSwiney family and not just the individual.

“I think that’s really, really important,” he said.

Sinn Féin councillor Mick Nugent welcomed the proposal as a worthwhile initiative.

“If it all goes to plan, it’s very significant. It’s very worthwhile and I think it’s a very positive move – it’s a historic move really,” he said.

There was some disagreement at the meeting regarding the Irish translation of the new street name.

It was proposed as Sráid Mhic Shuibhne, however this translation has not been finalised.

Notifying the public 

Following the unanimous agreement from city councillors to rename the street, the local authority must now notify the public.

Cork City Council must now publish a public notice of the proposal inviting submissions in writing from members of the public in relation to the proposal not later than two months from the date of the publication of the notice.

Once all submissions have been considered city councillors will then make a final decision.

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