Plans for residential development on Cork's northside refused by city planners

Plans for residential development on Cork's northside refused by city planners

Dunluce Land Holdings Ltd had applied for permission for 49 dwellings - houses and apartments - on lands off Fairfield Road, in Blackpool, but there was a significant amount of opposition to the proposals.

Plans to provide a “visually obtrusive” residential development that “would lead to serious pedestrian and vehicular conflict” in Cork city have been refused by Cork City Council’s planning department.

Dunluce Land Holdings Ltd had applied for permission for 49 dwellings - houses and apartments - on lands off Fairfield Road, in Blackpool, but there was a significant amount of opposition to the proposals.

A large number of third party submissions were made. Issues ranged from traffic concerns to issues with the proposed height of the development.

Other issues raised were concerns over anti-social behaviour, while cycle connectivity was also mentioned given the proposal for 88 bicycle parking spaces as part of the development.

The proposals sought permission for nine two-storey terraced houses - five two-bedroom, and four three-bedroom units.

Plans for 40 apartment units across a number of blocks were also included in the submission. The first two four-storey blocks were to each consist of eight two-bedroom apartments. The two three-storey blocks were to consist of four two-bed apartments and four one-bed apartments. One three-storey block of four three-bed apartments and four one-bed units were also included.

Developers said in their application that each house and apartment would have its own private amenity space.

However, Cork City Council's planning department said the proposals were “contrary to the policies and objectives of the Cork City Development Plan 2015-2021” adding that an adequate amount of open space amenity for future residents was not provided.

They also said the proposed development would be of “inappropriate scale” and that it would be out of character with the area.

“The height, nature, scale, and locations of the proposed three to four-story development at the Northern end of the site is considered to be a significant impact upon the protected landscape and townscape view,” the decision reads.

Traffic hazards resulting from the proposed development were also highlighted.

A “lack of pedestrian connectivity from the proposed development to existing footpath infrastructure” was one issue, while planners also found that “excessive traffic movements” were likely to be generated.

Local councillor Mick Nugent said both he and councillor Kenneth Collins has been contacted by residents with concerns about the development and its suitability and he feels the local community will be satisfied with the decision of the planners.

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