Greens fear docks’ plan

Greens fear docks’ plan

An aerial view east over Cork’s sprawling 160-hectare City Docks region. 

THE GREEN Party has raised concerns about moving the Port of Cork operations out of the city, saying it will end a thousand years of history. 

The party's Cork branch has published its own vision for the docklands and  

The Port of Cork plans to move its container operations to Ringaskiddy and has bought the former IFI plant at Marino Point in Cobh, as part of its plans to move away from the restricted city centre location. 

The Port's Custom House site is also the proposed location for a massive office block, which would become Ireland's tallest building if planning permission is granted. 

Green Party representative in Cork North Central Oliver Moran said: "We are still very skeptical of the decision to move the Port of Cork out of the city.

“It will mean that for the first time in its thousand-year history, Cork will not be a port city.” 

The party has published its submission to the pre-planning stages of the Cork City Docks and Tivoli Docks local area plans.

Their proposals include a Dockland Quarter in the south city docks, including residential and commercial elements and a transport hub, including a working dock and recreational amenities, at the north city docks. 

Their plans also include a social and cultural centre at the Customs House and high-density residential development with parklands and recreational facilities at Tivoli.

Mr Moran added: “Our proposal continues to keep working port facilities in the city, for ocean liners, public transport and recreation. It's critical too that the heritage of Cork is not lost in a cold, modern development. We want the redevelopment to draw on the history of Cork and the existing vibrant culture of the docklands - be that the railway station and quays on the North Docks or the pub culture, Paírc Uí Chaoimh and the Marquee surrounding the South Docks."

Port of Cork commercial manager, Captain Michael McCarthy, has dismissed the criticism of their plans.

“The new Docklands, as envisaged, is going to include recreational amenities and high-density housing,” he said. “Some of the cargo the port deals with is not suitable for discharging or unloading in such a residential area. So our plan is to move some of the cargo away from the area.

“Ports all over the world are doing this. Ships are getting bigger and need greater depth of water but that does not mean we will no longer be a port city.”

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