'Chanting, singing, public drinking, urinating': Residents upset by antisocial incidents as students return to Cork

'Chanting, singing, public drinking, urinating': Residents upset by antisocial incidents as students return to Cork

The Magazine Road and surrounding areas residents' group has said they will be asking the UCC President John O’Halloran to use severe reprimands, including, in some cases, expulsion, for students who are engaging in anti-social behaviour around the college.

UCC need to do “whatever it takes” to curtail the antisocial behaviour ongoing at residential areas in the vicinity of the campus, it has been claimed.

The Magazine Road and surrounding areas residents' group has said they will be asking the UCC President John O’Halloran to use severe reprimands, including, in some cases, expulsion, for students who are engaging in anti-social behaviour around the college.

Speaking on behalf of the residents’ group, Catherine Clancy said the organisation had a Zoom meeting on Monday with the UCC President.

The residents’ group spokesperson said a new week of celebrations and socialising called Sophomore Week was introduced, “without consultation” by the college in order to give second years, who would not have had a Freshers week last year, a chance to mix.

Mrs Clancy said these celebrations had led to severe incidents of anti-social behaviour on Sunday night.

“There has been chanting, singing, public drinking, urinating as well as defecating on the pavement and glass bottles smashed and thrown. As residents, we are very upset by this. It is very serious.” 

Ms Clancy said the residents and local community will have to endure more of the same for Fresher’s Week which will be later in the month and said something has to be done.

“We are very angry. We have sent footage to the college and to the guards and we have asked the UCC President to consider more expulsions for students who have no respect for the rules of the college.” 

The local resident said she understood that 90% of the thousands of students who attend the college are well behaved and said it is not beyond UCC to deal with the couple hundred students who are causing trouble.

“We want the president to write to the students and clearly state the consequences of breaking the rules.” 

Mrs Clancy also said the organisation would be reporting the properties involved to the Residential Tenancies Board.

Following a query from The Echo, a statement from the Gardai said that while they did respond to reports of groups gathered in the area they have no reports of any arrests or serious incidents.

“Proactive patrols were conducted by Gardaí in the area as part of local policing plans focussed on tackling anti-social behaviour and a number of people were moved on.” 

STATEMENT

A Statement from UCC said that the college was working with the Student Union to “promote awareness and adherence to public health guidelines and our wider responsibility to our community.” 

A college spokesperson said: “The vast majority of our 22,000 students have shown remarkable resilience in the face of an unprecedented challenge at a formative time of their lives. UCC Campus Watch is in place to receive any allegations of breaches of our Student Rules. 

"UCC met with local residents last night and will continue to work together with its community, Gardai and local authorities on this issue.” 

UCC SU president Asha Woodhouse also commented on the ongoing controversy, stating they were delighted to have students back on campus, but urged them to be considerate of the wider community they are a part of.

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Called Droid, our next story is about a boy who designs a robot at UCC and chaos ensues. It was written by Margaret Gillies, from the MA in Creative Writing Programme at UCC.

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