Cork city councillors to ask for north side scrambler bike support 

Cork city councillors to ask for north side scrambler bike support 

CITY councillors have agreed to request that the northside be included in a new, community-based response to tackling the misuse of scramblers and quad bikes. Stock image 

CITY councillors have agreed to request that the northside be included in a new, community-based response to tackling the misuse of scramblers and quad bikes.

Kenneth Collins and Mick Nugent, Sinn Féin councillors, proposed a motion that the council write to the garda commissioner and to the Government to request that Cork City North West and North East be included in the areas for the rollout of the community-based response to the misuse-of-scramblers and quad-bikes initiatives, and offer support in identifying suitable areas for repair and practice.

Quads and scramblers causing damage 

Speaking to The Echo, Mr Nugent noted issues with quad bikes and scramblers in the northside and damage to green areas and parks.

Mr Nugent said: “It seems that there is funding there, through the community-based initiative, to tackle their misuse.”

Mr Nugent said that he, along with Mr Collins and Thomas Gould, Sinn Féin TD, recently met with residents at Nash’s Boreen who had outlined issues with quad bikes and scramblers.

“It is an issue and sports pitches have been damaged, as well, over the years, so if there is funding there, I think we should try and tap into it.”

Last month, James Browne, law reform state minister, along with Helen McEntee, the justice minister, announced a new community-based response to the misuse of scramblers and quad bikes.

The Department of Justice, in collaboration with An Garda Síochána and other partners, will identify local communities most affected by scrambler misuse and will invite applications for financial assistance for projects to promote pro-social use of these vehicles.

Training and education

It is envisaged that these local projects will provide opportunities for training in vehicle handling, repair, and maintenance.

Financial assistance will be provided to projects in communities that are most affected by the misuse of the bikes.

The projects will also include second-chance education, personal development, and mentoring for young people who are interested in using these vehicles for sport and recreation.

At the time of the launch, Mr Browne said: “The anti-social use of scramblers and quad bikes in urban and rural communities poses a potentially serious risk to public safety, as well as impacting negatively on residents’ enjoyment of their local area.”

He said that the initiative will provide a “more coherent and tailored response to the issues connected with the anti-social use of scramblers and other vehicles”.

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