36 reports of anti-social behaviour made against Council tenants in 2020

36 reports of anti-social behaviour made against Council tenants in 2020

THIRTY-six new reports of anti-social behaviour were made to Cork City Council since the start of the year. Pictured: City Hall, Cork. Picture Dan Linehan

THIRTY-six new reports of anti-social behaviour were made to Cork City Council since the start of the year.

Statistics from Cork City Council were provided to members of the Cork City Joint Policing Committee earlier this week. The statistics also show that there have been 19 verbal warnings issued this year, along with 10 first written warnings, to tenants of city council properties.

Cork City Council outlined that interviews are arranged by the council’s housing officer with a complainant, after a complaint is received. The purpose of the interview is to discuss the issues reported, and to gain as much information as possible.

According to the council: “Following investigation, and where it is merited, a verbal warning may issue requesting that the behaviour being complained about cease immediately. The person is advised if the behaviour doesn’t cease, the matter will be further escalated and may ultimately lead to eviction. A formal written warning may issue in the first instance depending on the seriousness of the matter or if the verbal warning didn’t influence an improvement in the behaviour of the tenant/household member. A further written warning may have to issue if the previous warning(s) didn’t influence the tenant’s behaviour.” 

If the matter is not resolved, a Statutory Tenancy Warning, which has a 12-month lifespan, may be issued. Cases can end up in court if the matter still is not resolved, with the city council seeking an order for eviction of the tenant. A case may be closed if the incident has been resolved or if the complainant indicates that they do not want to pursue the matter further.

The council outlined: “A tenant may opt to surrender their tenancy rather than end up in court. It is important to note that Cork City Council can only initiate the above procedure where evidence exists of an actionable breach of tenancy. The City Council receives many complaints of allegations such as staring or intimidating looks which are impossible to prove.

“In relation to court proceedings, there is a significant burden of evidence required and where an order for eviction is obtained, the tenant may subsequently appeal the matter to the Circuit Court which can further delay any eviction.”

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