Environmental campaigners intend to object to Kildare Village-style outlet centre in Cork 

Environmental campaigners intend to object to Kildare Village-style outlet centre in Cork 
A €100 million Cork Tourist Outlet Village is proposed for  the Carrigtwohill area. 

Environmental campaigners have already signalled their intention to object to a proposed outlet centre in Carrigtwohill.

The East Cork area is set to be the home of a shopping outlet centre similar to Kildare Village after a British company submitted plans to Cork County Council.

The retail village is to be built at Killacloyne, Carrigtwohill, just off the Fota Junction on the N25 in East Cork.

The backers say the development is to create 850 jobs but requires a variation to the County Development Plan in order to get the go-ahead.

If approved, they said construction would take 24 months to complete and it could be open for business by March 2024.

Aerial picture showing the Carrigtwohill area with the planned retail outlet village marked in red.
Aerial picture showing the Carrigtwohill area with the planned retail outlet village marked in red.

The company said the retail outlet would attract 220,000 additional visitors to the region.

However, the Cork Environmental Forum has submitted an objection to a proposal to change the County Development Plan to allow a retail outlet centre to be built in Metropolitan Cork.

In the short submission, the environmental body said they were opposed to the change. 

“The plan to facilitate a Tourist Outlet Village in Carrigtwohill is not what the county needs to do to improve its retail offering and to support businesses and communities,” said spokesperson for the organisation Bernadette Connolly.

“It would be far more preferable if such investments were spent on improving the retail offerings of the villages and towns of East Cork which would have a much greater impact to rejuvenate these communities and support jobs more locally," she said.

Ms Connolly said that given the current climate crisis, the development was inappropriate.

“Given the context of the current climate crisis and the need to provide facilities that are easily accessed by more sustainable modes, having such a big centre which will still be accessed primarily by road is not future-proofing and does not align with climate adaptation and mitigation actions.” 

Ms Connolly also had concerns that there would be ramifications for other businesses in the area and a knock-on effect of a loss of jobs in neighbouring towns and the city.

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