Roy Keane volunteers at Cork soup kitchen

The Manchester United legend s a frequent visitor to the kitchen in Little Hanover Street in Cork city
Roy Keane volunteers at Cork soup kitchen

Olivia Kelleher

Roy Keane is known for his dry wit in his punditry but off camera he seems to have a softer touch as he spent Tuesday preparing sandwiches at the Cork soup kitchen Penny Dinners.

The former Republic of Ireland and Manchester United player is a frequent visitor to the kitchen in Little Hanover Street in Cork city and has quietly supported the charity for years.

Caitriona Twomey, of Penny Dinners, posted a picture of the former Assistant Manager of the Republic of Ireland team as he posed alongside fellow volunteers from a local secondary school.

Ms Twomey was full of praise for the ITV pundit who can at times be caustic in his analysis.

“Plenty of sandwiches being prepared today with the girls of St Angela's and Roy who seriously is such a fantastic person. When it comes to kindness he is in a league of his own.”

Keane is known for his benevolence in his native Cork where he also does a considerable amount of work for the Irish Guide Dogs for the Blind.

Ms Twomey, who runs the facility which gives out 2,000 meals a week, said that Keane has always been hugely generous behind the scenes without ever looking for praise or acclaim.

“He is very kindhearted. He has time for everyone.”

The Manchester United legend s a frequent visitor to the kitchen in Little Hanover Street in Cork city.

Meanwhile, Ms Twomey admits to feeling heartbroken at seeing the very obvious decline in the homeless community since the pandemic changed the way we live our lives. She says that homeless people really suffered during the lockdowns.

“With the lockdown people had to walk around an empty city all day long and fall asleep in the freezing cold as well. We have to keep positive and things rolling out because if they (service users) see us worried or fearful they become worried and fearful. We can see if people aren't doing well.

“You would nearly know by looking at them who is next to die.

“You are seeing things in a different light. You can see the deterioration. People who have always maintained an upbeat attitude and accepted their lot that is absolutely gone.

“People often don't see the point of living. There is a lot of despair.”

For information on how to donate go to corkpennydinners.ie

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