Kym Marsh’s father urges men to get checked for prostate cancer amid treatment

The awareness messages comes during Men’s Health Week and ahead of Father’s Day on Sunday.
Kym Marsh’s father urges men to get checked for prostate cancer amid treatment

By Naomi Clarke, PA Entertainment Reporter

Kym Marsh’s father has urged men to not hesitate over getting prostate examinations as he continues to receive treatment for an advanced form of the condition.

Last year the presenter and actress revealed her father Dave’s cancer had spread to other parts of his body after he put off going to the doctor during the pandemic.

Ahead of Father’s Day, Marsh was joined by her parents on BBC’s Morning Live on Friday to provide an update on his health and share his words of wisdom.

Dave Marsh said: “Well, I was stupid not to get it checked right at the beginning. I should have done and I didn’t and this is what’s happened to me.

“If there are any men out there, if you think you need a check, get it done, don’t linger, just get it done.”

This message also comes amid Men’s Health Week, which runs from June 13 to 19, with this year’s message highlighting the importance of taking stock of your overall health.

Marsh explained that she recently attended a hospital appointment with her father for the first time.

Speaking alongside her parents, she said: “It was really good for many reasons really. For one, because obviously there are questions we have as a family, and sometimes when I ask what happened at the appointment – you guys forget.

“So it was really good for me to be able to be there.

“We were expecting the cancer had spread because of your latest PSA blood results. Your PSA level had risen again in your blood.

“The good news was, although it has spread, it’s not gone to any of his organs so they were able to offer him another form of treatment which is called radium.”

The NHS website defines prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing as a blood test which can help detect prostate cancer, and radium as a chemical that can be injected into the body to help control pain caused by cancer and can slow down the progress of the disease.

Morning Live screens on weekdays at 9.15am on BBC One.

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