Dogs for the Disabled seek volunteers to foster puppies

Dogs for the Disabled, which has its headquarters in Togher, is asking people to consider taking in puppies or brood females for 12 to 14 months, with all expenses paid.
Dogs for the Disabled seek volunteers to foster puppies

Cork-based national charity Dogs for the Disabled is appealing for volunteers to take in puppies and broods.

A CORK-BASED national charity is appealing for volunteer families and individuals to foster puppies and broods.

Dogs for the Disabled, which has its headquarters in Togher, is asking people to consider taking in puppies or brood females for 12 to 14 months, with all expenses paid.

Jennifer Dowler, who founded Dogs for the Disabled in 2007, told The Echo that fostering dogs was a gift that keeps giving, as the love shown to puppies and dogs is always given back.

“We’re looking for volunteer families and individuals to take in puppies, and also volunteer families and individuals to take in brood bitches,” Ms Dowler said.

“With the broods, the volunteers would take the female into their home, where she would live like their pet dog.

“She would have two to three litters, and then would retire and become a pet, often to the family which took her in,” she said.

“Our breeding dogs don’t do task work, because they’re doing a big enough job having babies.”

Dogs for the Disabled is also appealing for volunteers to take in puppies, Ms Dowler said.

“We place the puppies around 12 weeks old, so they’re already toilet trained and we’ve already begun basic obedience training.

“What we’re really looking for is a safe, loving home that will allow the puppies to mature naturally, so that they develop the kind of skills they need to become great assistance dogs.

“It’s really that the people have the time and the energy to give the dogs the love and the care that they need so that they can naturally evolve,” Ms Dowler said.

“All costs are covered and full support is provided, and they would have the puppies for approximately 14 months.”

Ms Dowler admitted that it can be a big wrench when it comes time to part with fostered puppies and dogs, but she said people who take in dogs know the good they are doing.

“Most of our dogs go to kids who have disabilities, and most of our volunteers will foster dogs and puppies again and again because we see what the benefit is,” she said.

“It’s the gift that keeps on giving, because you’re giving love to the puppy, and when the puppy is an adult dog, they will give that love back, and usually to a kid who has a disability.

“That’s what our volunteers are giving, they’re giving the gift of love,” Ms Dowler said.

For more information, email info@dogsfordisabled.ie or Elizabeth@dogsfordisabled.ie Also see https://dogsfordisabled.ie/

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