On the Buses: "No matter what happens at least you were there for that person."

On the Buses: "No matter what happens at least you were there for that person."
On The Buses. Christina and Josephine Jones. Picture: Eddie O'Hare

TIGHTKNIT sisters en route to visit their mother in a nursing home revealed she no longer recognises them due to Alzheimer's disease.

This wasn't the first difficult journey for Josephine and Christina Jones who always face life's challenging hurdles together.

"Christina sat with me all through my chemo when I had breast cancer 11 years ago, "Josephine recalled.

Christina, who also travelling on the 202 route linking Cork city to Mahon and Knocknaheeny, added: "I was trying to hide how sad I was because Josephine was being so strong-minded. We're stubborn in our family. I think that's what gets us through. Our mum survived cancer too. That's who we're on our way to now actually."

"Mum has Alzheimer's so no longer recognises us. It's very hard going to visit on your own so it's lucky that we have each other. Mum is bed bound now and trying her best to talk. We just chat away. She looked happy last week."

Josephine added: "It was like she knew us."

Christina advised those in similar circumstances to battle on through the hardship.

"It's tough to visit a loved one who no longer recognises you. The visits are more for "you" really. It's about knowing that no matter what happens at least you were there for that person."

Josephine and Christine have stuck together through thick and thin "You just do your best. We have each other. That's the main thing."

The names of Joesphine's grandchildren tattooed across her arm serve as a reminder of the many blessings she has left.

"I can only tattoo one of my arms because I had the lymph nodes removed in the other. There's still a couple of more names I have to add," she said. 

"Having been sick does make you seize the day a bit more."

She advised those at their start of journey with breast cancer to stay strong.

"Of course you have your crying but you have to stay strong and not give into it," she said.

Monica O'Leary from Albert Road and her niece Carol Coleman had an equally unbreakable bond.

Monica O'Leary and Carol Coleman. Picture: Eddie O'Hare
Monica O'Leary and Carol Coleman. Picture: Eddie O'Hare

"Monica is the youngest of my mum's seven sisters. I go to her for the kind of things you can only go to a mum for. Good or bad, I go to her for everything. Mum passed away 27 years ago and Monica was always there for me. My mum wasn't just Monica's sister but her Godmother as well."

Finbar Daly from Mahon had returned to Ireland after retiring from a job in the UK.

Finbar Daly. Picture: Eddie O'Hare
Finbar Daly. Picture: Eddie O'Hare

"I worked in an organisation that enabled people with intellectual disabilities to live independently. I really loved it. The UK government were very good for supporting people with intellectual disabilities."

"The organisation was a 24-hour service as many of the service users suffered from medical issues like epilepsy and needed the support."

Finbar has fond memories of his time with the organisation's service users.

"We even all went on holidays to Ireland together. They loved it because it was so new to them."

Michael O'Sullivan and his wife Marie from Knocknaheeny were still reeling after the loss of their beloved dog Saffy.

Michael and Marie O'Sullivan. Picture: Eddie O'Hare
Michael and Marie O'Sullivan. Picture: Eddie O'Hare

"Saffy was a rescue dog. We got her 13 years ago when she was just a year old. She died of a heart complaint after being sick for a year and a half. Saffy was like my little shadow."

"What I miss most is the sound of her little paws on the wooden floor. Every time I opened the fridge she would be standing there right next to me. My hope is to adopt another rescue dog as I feel that would be a fitting tribute to Saffy. That's hard to do when you're wrapped up in mourning but I will get around to it soon."

Airline studies student Dylan Crowley from Hollyhill spoke of his passion for aviation.

Dylan Crowley. Picture: Eddie O'Hare
Dylan Crowley. Picture: Eddie O'Hare

"My dad fixes engines in planes. I've learned to fly a plane with the use of a simulator. It's something I've been doing since around the age of 12 or 13."

"People are often amazed at the number of buttons it has but I've never found it that hard. I do a lot of research and take notes on how I can improve in order to move forward."

The 19-year-old added that he would like to eventually train as a pilot one day, but his main goal is just to be happy.

While most other two-year-old's are playing with dolls Katie Beadle has other things on her mind.

Paul and Katie Beadle. Picture: Eddie O'Hare
Paul and Katie Beadle. Picture: Eddie O'Hare

"She's a real tomboy and loves motorbikes," her dad Paul said.

While most people complain about our climate bus driver Jarek Kimok is thankful for it.

Bus driver Jarek Kimok. Picture: Eddie O'Hare
Bus driver Jarek Kimok. Picture: Eddie O'Hare

"I've never liked the heat," the Polish native said. "There's a nice climate here."

The last word of the day went to Richard Keating from Hollyhill.

On The Buses. Richard Keating. Picture: Eddie O'Hare
On The Buses. Richard Keating. Picture: Eddie O'Hare

"Although I have back problems I still try to get out walking as much as possible," he told the Evening Echo. "I also have a wonderful wife named Bernadette."

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