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Statue of Cork Echo boy
Statue of Cork Echo boy
SOCIAL BOOKMARKS

A new dawn for The Echo as Cork's newspaper hits the shelves in the morning

Tomorrow marks the start of a new era for The Echo, bringing Cork readers their news first thing in the morning.
The newspaper and website, www.echolive.ie, are dedicated to telling the stories of Cork, and continuing a publishing tradition that dates back to 1892.

The move to morning publication is just the latest in a long series of changes over our 127 years.

When the Evening Echo first hit the streets it was printed on pink paper; possibly to set the new title apart from the existing Cork Examiner.

It soon moved to white and as demand grew, so did the number of editions.

The Evening Echo reports the death of Michael Collins in 1922. Picture courtesy of Daltons Bar.
The Evening Echo reports the death of Michael Collins in 1922. Picture courtesy of Daltons Bar.

From three times a week, the Echo shifted to being published daily from Monday to Saturday, a tradition that continues today.

The editors and printers had their ingenuity tested during ‘The Emergency’ years, when paper shortages meant the newspaper had to be printed on a single sheet at times.

Outside the offices on Patrick Street, May 1940. Crowds wait for copies of the Evening Echo for news of World War II.
Outside the offices on Patrick Street, May 1940. Crowds wait for copies of the Evening Echo for news of World War II.

Given that today we have 56 pages of news and sport for our readers, plus supplements, we can only imagine the difficult choices that had to be made about what news to cover.

Yes, there was a war on but the Echo has always been devoted primarily to local news and sport, so it must have been a constant battle for space.

The shortages did not end with the war in 1945, and it was 1952 before the number of pages could be increased to four.

The news and adverts of the day were crammed in to provide value for the 1d price, and when the Echo went up to eight pages at Christmas 1952, the price rose to 2d.

There was another big change in 1991 when the newspaper moved from a broadsheet to its current compact format.

In the last two decades, the big change for us has been the increasing move to online news.

Our website www.echolive.ie is going from strength to strength, as the people of Cork become as likely to read us on their phones as in the newspaper.

As reporters, we don’t mind how you read our stories, only that you do.

Over the years, the news and sports teams have covered the events, big and small, that matter to the people of Cork.

As befits the sport-mad Rebel county, many of our most memorable front pages have been devoted to the exploits of individuals and teams representing us on the national and world stage.

Mayfield’s Roy Keane, recently voted Ireland’s greatest footballer of all time, provided plenty of talking points over the years, most notably the Saipan affair which became the country's biggest debate in summer 2002.

Roy Keane at Saipan International Airport prior to his departure. 
Roy Keane at Saipan International Airport prior to his departure. 

Our sports reporters have also chronicled Cork City’s tumultuous journey and, along with our readers, revelled in the recent success.

There has been success on the athletics track too. Sonia O’Sullivan, Rob Heffernan and Derval O’Rourke have given us plenty to write about and the tradition continues with Lizzie Lee and Phil Healy.

In recent years, Sanita Puspure, the O’Donovan brothers and Cork’s many other phenomenal rowers have gotten us as used to medals from the water as the track.

When it comes to uniting the whole city and county, there is little to match the exploits of our Gaelic games teams.

From the individual brilliance of players like Christy Ring to the stunning dominance of our ladies Gaelic football and camogie squads, Cork loves nothing more than success in our national sports.

You love the games and we love writing about them, our level of sports coverage will remain unchanged under the new masthead.

Moving from the back of the paper to the front, we have a lot to look forward to covering in the coming months. The local elections in May should throw up plenty of drama and that is before we even begin to consider the possibility of a directly-elected mayor.

We will also continue to cover the ongoing debates and issues in Cork, from the boundary extension to flood plans, from the event centre to the city centre movement strategy.

As our Editor, Maurice Gubbins says: “Our mission is straightforward: Cork news and Cork sport for Cork people!”