What the papers say: Thursday's front pages

All the day's top stories from the national newspapers
What the papers say: Thursday's front pages

By PA Reporter

Another wave of Covid-19, budget pressures and a review in the murder of Sophie Toscan du Plantier are some of Wednesday's front page stories.

The Irish Times leads with 'Pressure mounts for early budget in September', despite senior members of the Government's repeatedly stressing that no measures will be announced to tackle the rising cost of living until the budget in October.

The announcement from Gardaí that the force will open a fresh review into the death of Frenchwoman Sophie Toscan du Plantier is also covered, along with reports that the HSE is backing changes at Our Lady's Hospital in Navan, Co Meath, changing the Emergency Department to a 24-hour medical assessment and injury unit.

The Irish Examiner also covers the review into Ms Toscan du Plantier, carrying remarks from her son, Pierre Louis Baudey-Vignaud, who was just 15 when his mother was killed in Schull, Co Cork.

The paper's lead story, however, reads: 'Covid threats loom over holiday plans' as Aer Lingus were forced to cancel a number of flights from Dublin Airport due to Covid-related staff shortages.

The Echo covers the wrapping up of the Covid-19 sick payment for healthcare workers, quoting a Cork nurse as saying those suffering with long-Covid have been "thrown under the bus" by the Government.

The Irish Independent's headline reads: 'Sophie cold case: new witnesses key to probe', above an image from Wednesday's Pro-Am at Mount Juliet, Co Kilkenny ahead of the Irish Open, showing former Republic of Ireland teammates John O'Shea and Robbie Keane alongside actor James Nesbitt.

Finally, the Irish Daily Mail reads: 'Parents are now skipping dinners', after figures from the Central Statistics Office (CSO) revealed Ireland has the second-highest food prices in the Eurozone.

 

In Britain, the publication of the annual "sovereign grant" report showing how much the monarchy cost the public is one of the stories leading Thursday’s papers.

The Daily Mirror reacts to the revelation that the royals cost taxpayers £102.4 million last year, telling them to "reign it in".

The Daily Mail covers another aspect from the report, writing that Buckingham Palace "buried" a "bullying" inquiry against the Britain's Duchess of Sussex towards staff.

The Daily Express adds that a palace insider has responded to reports that between 2011 and 2015 Britain's Prince Charles accepted up to €3 million in cash stuffed in bags from a Qatari Sheikh for his charity. The aide reportedly said it would "not happen again".

Elsewhere, The Independent carries a report that housing providers have been "cashing in" on houses for the vulnerable.

The Sun‘s front page says friends of the late Dame Deborah James have urged "big-hearted Brits to push her Bowelbabe fund past £10 million as the ultimate ‘thank you'".

The privatisation of NHS care accelerated by Tory policies a decade ago has corresponded with a decline in quality and "significantly increased" rates of death from treatable causes, according to The Guardian.

Meanwhile, allies of British prime minister Boris Johnson fear an inquiry into whether he misled the British parliament over partygate risks will become a "kangaroo court" by relying on "hearsay evidence", The Daily Telegraph writes.

Elsewhere, the Financial Times' front page carries comments made by the Bank of England governor that inflation will hit the UK economy harder than any other.

Metro has the latest from the war in Ukraine, reporting that the US has promised to send 100,000 troops to the Russian border as Nato invites Finland and Sweden to join.

And the Daily Star says Nasa scientists have been left baffled over a "mystery spacecraft" that crashed into the Moon, leaving an "odd crater".

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