Post-Brexit immigration to form part of new shared island research

Post-Brexit immigration in Northern Ireland has been flagged as an area for research, alongside childcare, energy and productivity levels.
Post-Brexit immigration to form part of new shared island research

By Dominic McGrath, PA

Post-Brexit immigration on the island of Ireland will form part of new Government-backed research.

The move is part of the Government’s Shared Island Initiative and is the second year that the Department of the Taoiseach will work with the Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI) to investigate all-island issues.

The Shared Island initiative, a personal passion of Taoiseach Micheál Martin, seeks to develop and build cross-Border relationships on the island.

Post-Brexit immigration in Northern Ireland has been flagged as an area for research, alongside childcare, energy and productivity.

The research will form part of a broader look at the integration of immigrants on the island.

According to a paper published as part of the announcement, “the project will explore the implications of post-Brexit immigration changes in Northern Ireland on the lives of migrants and their families”.

The report notes that the impact of Brexit on “mobility across the border for migrants is still evolving”.

“There have been a range of impacts on the rights and ease of cross-border access for health, education, work and recreation purposes.

“This particularly affects all who are legally resident on the island but not comprehended by the Common Travel
Area, namely non-Irish and non-British migrants from other EU countries or from outside the EU.”

It is expected that full reports will be published before the end of the year on the research areas.

“The partnership between the Shared Island unit in my Department and the Economic and Social Research Institute is providing new, considered analysis and research across a range of areas, helping inform political and civic discussions on how we can better work together on this island,” Mr Martin said.

“The research topics for 2022 cover a broad range of areas – from childcare to renewable energy – issues that impact people’s lives on both sides of the border.

“These issues can, and should be examined and addressed more collaboratively on an island-wide basis, and this research will inform Government on how we can work through all-island partnerships to create a more sustainable, connected and prosperous island for all.”

ESRI director Professor Alan Barrett said: “The all-island perspective will allow us to generate new and interesting insights.

“By comparing approaches, experiences and outcomes, we hope to learn lessons for policy which can be implemented in both Ireland and Northern Ireland, with benefits for people throughout the island.”

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