Low density developments in areas like Sandymount to no longer get planning approval

An Bord Pleanála has signalled that low density residential developments in the likes of Sandymount in Dublin 4 will no longer secure planning permission
Low density developments in areas like Sandymount to no longer get planning approval

Gordon Deegan

An Bord Pleanála has signalled that low density residential developments in the likes of Sandymount in Dublin 4 will no longer secure planning permission.

This follows the appeals board refusing planning permission to contentious plans by Walthill Properties Ltd for an 18 unit house scheme for Baggotrath House, Newbridge Avenue, Sandymount because the scheme didn’t come with more homes.

In refusing planning permission for the scheme located 500 metres from Sandymount village, the appeals board stated the proposal would “provide an insufficient density of the development at this location” and “would constitute under-utilisation of this residential zoned site”.

The scheme included 12 three-storey three-bedroom homes.

Council approval

The appeals board refusal overturns a decision by Dublin City Council to grant planning permission in November 2020.

The Council decision sparked a local backlash with six separate appeals lodged with An Bord Pleanála against the grant of permission from William Ryan, Anthony Peto, John Sheil and Maria Sheil, Eamon and Catriona Hughes, Noel Boyle and Helen Fitzgerald and Brendan Kinsella.

However, it is now open to Eugene Renehan’s Walthill Properties to lodge revised plans for a scheme with the Council that must contain more units than the 18-unit scheme that was refused.

One of the conditions attached to the Council grant of permission was that the scheme not be a gated community.

In refusing planning permission, the appeals board dismissed the recommendation of its own inspector to grant planning permission.

The board stated that it shared the inspector’s view that the scheme’s density was materially below the minimum recommended density.

The board however stated that it did not share the inspector’s view that with the prevailing density and character of the area that the lower density could be considered in the case.

In their appeals, the local residents variously claimed that the scheme represents overdevelopment, will result in overlooking, overshadowing and a depreciation in the value of property.

Meanwhile, in a separate decision, the appeals board has granted 'fast track' planning permission to Denver Valley Developments for a 179 unit apartment ‘fast track’ scheme for a site at Bray Head House and the former site of the North Wicklow Educate Together school in Bray.

The bulk of the apartments will be across three apartment blocks rising to five and six storeys in height.

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