Danny Murphy on Galway's demise: Money isn't in women's game to invest in players

'I would love to be able to give them something but from a financial perspective, it just isn’t there so we can’t do it.'
Danny Murphy on Galway's demise: Money isn't in women's game to invest in players

Cork City's Zara Foley side-stepping Galway's Shauna Brennan in the Women’s National League at Turner's Cross. Picture: Denis Minihane.

A DIFFICULT week for all at Galway Women’s Football Club ended with further disappointment as Cork City snatched the victory in their Women’s National League clash at Turner’s Cross thanks to Becky Cassin’s 90th-minute finish.

A few days before that fixture, Galway WFC's Chairman Stephen Moran announced that the club won't be applying to be included in the league next season and cited additional costs as a major factor.

Moran admitted that it has become difficult to give the women's team "what they truly deserve" with expenses rising from €20,000 when it was founded back in 2012 to €160,000 this year.

It is believed that discussions are ongoing between Galway United and the FAI about the prospect of forming a new women’s team ahead of next season.

And shortly after City’s win against Galway last weekend, manager Danny Murphy reluctantly provided his thoughts on the situation and also provided an insight into how his club operates.

“If I really wanted to go into it, it’s disappointing,” began Murphy.

“My thing is that the money isn’t there in the league to go out and be spending money on players.

“It just isn’t there so when clubs put themselves in that situation for me you have only got one person to blame and it’s yourselves.

“I don’t see how teams are able to do it and I know a lot of the Dublin clubs are doing it.

"It’s different if you are giving girls jobs and doing things like that but some of them are getting money that you are like that going; it’s only going to happen again.

It will happen again, more teams will drop out so there needs to be a better structure in place that either team can’t do it, or else it needs to be you can only spend from what you are bringing in.

“I try not to get involved in this stuff and I don’t really want to talk about it but people will blame the FAI and blame other people but I would say get your things right yourself before you go looking and pointing at other people.

HIGH DEMANDS

“We don’t pay the girls and we put high demands on the girls. They train three nights a week and then play on a matchday.

"I would love to be able to give them something but from a financial perspective, it just isn’t there so we can’t do it.

“But we will try to provide them with other things, and we are trying to do things in a better way and hopefully we will get to the stage where we can start paying the girls.

“But we have got to do better in the league so we can get more league money, we have got to generate bigger crowds and bring more sponsors in.

“We are going to break even as a football club and not spend money that we don’t bring in.”

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