East Cork's Tim O'Donoughue and Leevale's Lizzie Lee take the honours at the Cork City Marathon

The marathon started on St Patrick’s Street at 8.30am, with the half marathon starting later on Monahan Road at 10.15am.
East Cork's Tim O'Donoughue and Leevale's Lizzie Lee take the honours at the Cork City Marathon

Winning feeling- First male runner Tim O'Donoghue of East Cork AC crosses the finish line in a time of 2;18;37 to win the Cork City Marathon on Sunday 5th June 2022. Pic: Larry Cummins

Torrential downpours failed to dampen the spirits of more than 12,000 runners in Sunday’s Cork City Marathon.

Coming first was Midleton native Tim O’Donoghue, from East Cork AC. 

His time of 2.18.37 set a new course record.

He managed to maintain the lead from at least the Jack Lynch Tunnel with Pawel Kosek, closely following, and then through the 10k mark, the 21.1k mark and by the 30k mark he had established a strong lead.

The first woman home was Cork's Leevale AC runner and mother-of-three Lizzie Lee. 

She came in at 2.44.54.

Straight after was Kerry native and government press officer, Sorcha Loughnane from the Dublin-based Donore Harriers. 

She ran a time of 2.45.12.

The women had been running neck and neck for much of the race.

Socha started working in the Taoiseach's office two months ago.

Previously, she had worked as a press officer with the Department of the Environment, Climate and Communications.

 Winning feeling- First female Lizzie Lee of Leeevale crosses the finish line to win the Cork City Marathon on Sunday 5th June 2022. Pic: Larry Cummins
Winning feeling- First female Lizzie Lee of Leeevale crosses the finish line to win the Cork City Marathon on Sunday 5th June 2022. Pic: Larry Cummins

Brighton AB Training Group placed first in the relay with a finish time of 02:14:03.

The marathon event, which was the biggest to take place in Munster so far this year, saw runners from all over the world endure the 42.195km course in almost constant rain.

It started on St Patrick’s Street at 8.30am, with the half marathon starting later on Monahan Road at 10.15am.

Waiting for runners at the finishing line on St Patrick’s Street were 3,000 litres of water, thanks to Refill Ireland.

Several road closures and traffic diversions have been in place since early morning with traffic restrictions across the city and surrounding areas between 6am and 6pm.

In addition to 39 race pacers, there are 280 race stewards, 160 water-stations volunteers, and around 110 medical volunteers.

110 Gardaí, and 20 Defence Forces personnel are stationed around the course.

Now in its 14th year, this year’s Cork City Marathon is the first in-person event for three years.

Last year’s virtual event saw over 4,000 people taking part from 70 different countries.

Among those running this year is a woman who was almost killed in a hit and run six years ago.

Olivia Keating ran the race alongside the emergency doctor who helped save her life in 2016.

She had been training to run the 2016 Cork City Marathon when she was struck by a car and left for dead in a ditch near Ballinascarthy.

Herself and Dr Jason van der Velde, the consultant in emergency medicine who saved her life, took part in today’s race to raise money for the West Cork Rapid Response that will be used to train volunteer medics in groups like the civil defence and St John’s Ambulance.

Members of the C Team Cancer Survivors relay team (from left) Mossy Shanahan, Glasheen, Cork; Robert Jeffers, Douglas, Cork; John Quigley, Douglas; Brian Jackman, Kilmacthomas, and Ned O'Brien, Clogheen, Co. Tipperary, before the Cork City Marathon and Relay.
Members of the C Team Cancer Survivors relay team (from left) Mossy Shanahan, Glasheen, Cork; Robert Jeffers, Douglas, Cork; John Quigley, Douglas; Brian Jackman, Kilmacthomas, and Ned O'Brien, Clogheen, Co. Tipperary, before the Cork City Marathon and Relay.

Also taking part are the Sanctuary Runners, the solidarity through sports initiative that welcomes refugees, which was recently acknowledged for its work at the UN in New York.

The group, which has almost 6,000 participants in 29 groups across Ireland, has put forward a team of more than 200 runners including around 20 people who have fled war in Ukraine as well as asylum seekers and refugees from other countries living in direct provision centres.

Founder and chief executive Graham Clifford said including Ukrainian people in this year’s marathon was very important.

He worked with Together Razem, the Cork-based migrant-led organisation providing support services to the Polish and eastern European migrants in Ireland to include Ukrainians in this year’s event.

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