Cork Boxing: Kellie Harrington needs more official recognition for her brilliance

Dublin boxer's recent Late Late Show appearance highlighted why the IABA in Dublin must acknowledging her success.
Cork Boxing: Kellie Harrington needs more official recognition for her brilliance

Mick O'Brien makes a presentation to Cork boxer Mick O'Brien. Picture: Doug Minihane.

IRISH amateur boxing was truly enhanced last week when Kellie Harrington took her place as the grand marshal to lead the Dublin St Patrick's Day parade.

This parade was watched by millions throughout the world. On St Patrick's night Kellie was one of the special guests on the Late Late Show.

Here, she proved to be an outstanding ambassador for Irish boxing. 

When interviewed she was entertaining and informed the audience with refreshing modesty and honesty.

She is a great story teller and a fine singer and gave a great rendition of the classic ballad Grace.

Kellie Harrington, Ireland's latest Olympic boxing champion, is an athlete all male and female boxers in this country can look to as a role model.

She has set standards and remains loyal to amateur boxing which is a great attribute to the love of the sport and she takes pride in the country she has represented with distinction.

Cork boxing PRO Mick O'Brien said: "We in Cork were delighted to acknowledge her achievements as an international boxing super star. 

"She was invited to visit Cork two years ago to enjoy all local landmarks.

"This young lady is a special gem in Irish sporting history as she now has the distinction of winning the big double, a world title and an Olympic gold medal."

As part of her visit, which was arranged by Tom Murray of the Muskery boxing club who is also a distinguished Irish coach and has truly made a contribution to the development of boxing on Leeside, she was received at city hall where she signed the distinguished visitors book.

On that occasion, she displayed her prestigious medals. 

She was formally welcomed to the seat of power in Cork by the deputy Lord Mayor, Cllr, Fergal Dennehy, who made a special presentation to her to mark her visit.

The Cork County Board took great pride in her world-conquering success and also made a presentation on behalf of all in Cork boxing.

Following her recent appearance on the Late Late show, O Brien said he was saddened and disappointed with the IABA in Dublin for not officially acknowledging her success.

The IABA can boast 18 Olympic medals since we first participated in the Olympic Games at Paris 1924. 

Among those are three Olympic gold medal winners, Michael Carruth in 1992, Katie Taylor in 2012, and Kellie Harrington in 2020.

Sadly, O'Brien added, "When one enters the national stadium, there is nothing to mark their success but bare walls."

O'Brien stated that those officials should lead by example and initiate proper recognition of our champions.

Cork County Board president Billy O’Sullivan with the Boy 2 62kg finalists Noah O’Riordan of Midleton BC (in White) and Anthony Sexton of Golden Gloves BC. Picture: Doug Minihane
Cork County Board president Billy O’Sullivan with the Boy 2 62kg finalists Noah O’Riordan of Midleton BC (in White) and Anthony Sexton of Golden Gloves BC. Picture: Doug Minihane

Meanwhile, following the recent Cork County 2022 County boxing Championships, the Echo published a two-page special with a report on the success of the event.

This was well received by the Cork boxing public. Likewise, when the ongoing All-Ireland series are completed a two- page special will be published listing Cork's All-Ireland champions.

These boxers will then be presented with their Jack McAuliffe gold medals sponsored by the Cork Ex-Boxers Association. These medals this year will have an extra motif encompassing the golden jubilee of CEBA.

Recently a very complimentary letter was received from Mick O'Neill, and he was making enquiries about the Cork County Boxing Championships medal won by his grandson.

Paddy Delaney of Charleville BC jumps for joy following his hard-fought final victory over Ryan Buttimer of Northside BC at the Cork County Boxing Championships. Picture: Doug Minihane
Paddy Delaney of Charleville BC jumps for joy following his hard-fought final victory over Ryan Buttimer of Northside BC at the Cork County Boxing Championships. Picture: Doug Minihane

O'Neill wished to know about the four iconic buildings on the medals and what they represented. The Cork County Championship medals were designed as a semblance of pride to each winner of a country title. It was done to provide the athlete with a cherished souvenir of boxing success on Leeside.

This medal is of standout quality is designed to stand the test of time, and it is hoped that in years to come, it will provide the winner with an opportunity to show this medal to their grand grandchildren.

The four Cork landmarks on the medals include the North chapel, Shandon, the City Hall and St Finbar's of the southside of the city.

Each location has an historic attachment. The north chapel was selected as if was the church that recieved the remains of Tomás Mac Curtain, the murdered Lord Mayor of Cork and first president of the Glen Boxing club.

Shandon was selected as it shadows many of Cok's famous boxing clubs. The City hall has been the ancestral home of Cork boxing since 1936, and St Finbars cathedral is named after the man who founded the city of Cork.

The Cork County Board is proud to present its champions with meaningful medals of sporing and historical significance.

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