As Cork know too well, dynasties come and go in sport and Dublin's will too

As Cork know too well, dynasties come and go in sport and Dublin's will too

Cork captain Graham Canty lifts the Sam Maguire Cup in 2010 at Croke Park. Picture: David Maher/SPORTSFILE

SPORTING dynasties are common across all disciplines around the Globe.

If there was a World Cup in rugby in the morning, the All-Blacks would be favourites and it’s ditto for Brazil in its soccer equivalent.

And it’s not just confined to team sports either, witness Tiger Woods’s monopoly of golf, Serena Williams’s grip on tennis and before them Ali in boxing.

Champions emerge from a tiny base. You only have to flick through the history books to note a small coterie of teams and individuals are regular winners.

Take the All-Ireland senior hurling championship as an example.

Only three counties dominate with Kilkenny, Cork and Tipperary supplying 94 titles between them and the rest are nowhere.

Cork captain Ray Cummins prepares to make his speech after being presented with the Liam MacCarthy Cup by GAA President Con Murphy in 1976. Picture: Connolly Collection/SPORTSFILE
Cork captain Ray Cummins prepares to make his speech after being presented with the Liam MacCarthy Cup by GAA President Con Murphy in 1976. Picture: Connolly Collection/SPORTSFILE

And it’s the same in football with Kerry and Dublin sharing 66 and all the others trailing way back in their slip-stream.

Ok, every now and again someone will emerge from the pack and take over the mantle, but it’s usually only fleeting and normality returns fairly quickly again.

Dublin’s emergence to gain a stranglehold in football in recent years has prompted a convulsion of radical opinions about unearthing a solution.

Neighbour counties merging was one of the knee-jerk reactions to challenging their status as the greatest football side of all time.

Those projecting such an approach cited examples like Cavan-Monaghan, Kildare-Laois and Donegal-Derry.

You can forget it straight away because no county in the entire country will be prepared to sacrifice its place in the GAA world.

Club and county identities are what form the backbone of the association, starting with the smallest parish right up to the biggest metropolitan areas.

Lose any part of that wouldn’t be entertained from the get-go and it wouldn’t even reach a casual discussing stage. It’s a non-runner, full stop.

I don’t recall any such clamour, when Kerry’s great football team of the 1970s and early 80s or more recently with Brian Cody’s Kilkenny dominated.

There were no debates about divided the counties either like the present chat about splitting the capital in two.

Could you imagine the outcry back in west Kerry if the Kingdom had two teams representing the north and the south of the county in the championship back in the day?

Similarly, there was no mention of halving Kilkenny just to give the others a chance of playing catch-up.

However, there is a deep resentment in some quarters about the extent of the money invested by Croke Park in developing football and hurling in Dublin.

For way too long GAA in the capital languished behind soccer and, to a lesser degree, rugby, which was the dominant sport in the more affluent areas of the city.

Money poured into Dublin GAA and its return is easily identifiable in the current stature of the county’s footballers, though less so with the hurlers, who are still striving for a major breakthrough.

Leinster rivals are particularly miffed about the extent of the funding invested in the capital and they’re clamouring for a more equitable distribution of cash.

That’s not a short-term solution and you could even argue if it falls into providing answers in the first instance.

And as we all know now money is most certainly in short supply in the coffers of not only the GAA but the other main sporting organisations, too, the FAI and the IRFU.

That’s why a meeting on Saturday is set to divulge the first course of action to be taken by the GAA for the 2021 season, which will be all about getting bodies back into stadia, especially Croker.

In the same breath, the scheduling for next season will revolve around enticing all the Antos back onto the Hill and filling the Cusack and Hogan stands as often as possible next summer.

It’s said the GAA created a monster in the form of the Dublin footballers, but now it’s the turn of the capital to repay that huge financial investment by supporting the Dubs every time they play.

As for the chasing pack, they should really look at getting their own houses in order.

And, yet, be mindful of the fact that all dynasties have one thing in common. They do end.

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