Cork GAA Clubs not expected to record temperatures of players before training

Cork GAA Clubs not expected to record temperatures of players before training
Tadhg Donavan, chairman of Buttevant GAA Club, opens the gates at the club after walkways in clubs were reopened last Monday. Picture: Eóin Noonan/Sportsfile

THE GAA has streamlined the protocol for club officials overseeing the resumption of hurling and football on June 29.

GAA, ladies football and camogie players will be able to train again two weeks from Monday in small groups of 10 with two coaches on hand with a view to full sessions taking place from July 20, Phase Four of the roadmap out of Covid-19 restrictions.

After reading the original document outlining the GAA's rules on the return to club training, many were left with the impression that the newly-appointed Covid Supervisors would be expected to take the temperature of players and also collect health questionnaires before each session.

However, the Association has clarified some of the details, with a webinar for clubs taking place next Tuesday at 6pm to clarify details. All stakeholders, which includes players and parents/guardians, will have to complete an online certified eLearning Module, available from next Thursday.

The GAA explained in a statement:

"Clubs will not be expected to record the temperatures of players when they arrive for training/games.

"Adult players and parents/guardians of underage players will be required to complete an online health questionnaire once prior to their return to GAA Activities.

"Adult players and parents/guardians of underage players will then be required to declare, before each training session/game, that their health status has not changed.

"An online system for the health questionnaire will be provided centrally by the GAA. This is the only system that should be used.

Shamrock Rovers' director of football Stephen McPhail at their return to training last Monday. Picture: INPHO/Ryan Byrne
Shamrock Rovers' director of football Stephen McPhail at their return to training last Monday. Picture: INPHO/Ryan Byrne

"Through education on roles and responsibilities, the programme aims to reinforce how collective responsibility can help protect the health and welfare of all those involved in Gaelic Games and minimise the risk of transmission of Covid-19 in local communities.

"The programme will be delivered in stages with the initial offering focussing on Covid Supervisors and club officers.

"More detailed information for players and parents/guardians of underage players, and Team personnel such as managers, Coaches and medical personnel will be issued from Monday."

The Association will also release information on specific Covid-19 education for referees and games development staff, which will cover Cúl Camps, from next week.

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