Standard of driving in Cork City is 'appalling', policing committee hears

A councillor described the standard of driving in the city as “appalling”.
Standard of driving in Cork City is 'appalling', policing committee hears

The comments was made during a meeting of the Cork City Joint Policing Committee (JPC) today during which a discussion of the right-turn bans onto Christy Ring Bridge and Patrick’s Bridge as well as driver etiquette and high traffic volumes arose. Pic: Larry Cummins. 

THE chief executive of Cork City Council has urged motorists to have due consideration for other road users when driving in the city and to abide by the new traffic flow arrangements introduced in the city centre in early August.

Ann Doherty was speaking during a meeting of the Cork City Joint Policing Committee (JPC) today during which a discussion of the right-turn bans onto Christy Ring Bridge and Patrick’s Bridge as well as driver etiquette and high traffic volumes arose.

“I think it’s very hard to assess if something is working or it isn’t when half the people using it are flouting it. People turning right over the two bridges are blocking up all the traffic,” Ms Doherty said.

“If we could all as drivers stick to the rules of the road, stay out of the yellow boxes and only turn where it’s legal to do so, it might be a better way to assess the impact of changes.

“I think as well we shouldn’t forget the impact of Dunkettle at the moment. 

“There’s massive change going down there and we definitely are aware that the volumes of traffic in the city centre are high, higher than we would have expected, so you’d have to question whether there is a cause and effect from the Dunkettle piece… I do think that the more and more that opens up down there will help,” she continued.

'STANDARD IS APPALLING'

During the meeting, Fianna Fáil councillor Terry Shannon described the standard of driving in the city as “appalling”.

He expressed concerns over motorists parking on double yellow lines, blocking yellow boxes and breaking lights.

“People need to be a bit more mindful of their fellow motorists and have a bit of consideration for everybody else,” he said.

“I do think, during the Christmas period when traffic is very heavy, I hope to see guards at strategic junctions to try and maybe keep the traffic flowing and ensure that people aren’t particularly sitting in yellow boxes because that’s where the gridlock comes from,” he continued.

Responding, Superintendent John Deasy said that this approach has been tested but that it is considered more effective to keep the roads policing unit mobile.

“We have, in the past, placed Gardaí at junctions and what the powers that be will tell us is that if we start impacting on the sequence of lights at particular junctions it has a knock on effect across the city so we try to stay away from that type of interference with traffic management.

“I know it can be frustrating. I know people say that if there’s a guard at a junction it improves road etiquette but we’re trying to keep the roads policing unit mobile so that they can deal with situations as they arise,” he said.

“There is a lot going on in the city at the moment in relation to traffic and we’re just trying to ease it and assist it as much as we can.” 

Meanwhile, Chief Superintendent Tom Myers, said Gardaí will be conducting “a lot of checkpoints” over the Christmas period.

At the meeting yesterday he made an appeal for motorists never to drink and drive or drive under the influence of drugs, to reduce their speed, wear a safety belt and to not use mobile phones while driving.

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