Councillors vote to sell adjoining derelict properties on historic Cork city street

At a full meeting of council yesterday evening, councillors approved a proposed property disposal of 118 and 119 Barrack Street for €275,000 plus VAT if applicable
Councillors vote to sell adjoining derelict properties on historic Cork city street

In a report to councillors ahead of the meeting, the city council’s chief executive, Ann Doherty said the sum “represents the best consideration reasonably obtainable based on an open market sales process and an independent evaluation process”. Pictured is City Hall. Picture: Denis Minihane.

CORK city councillors have voted to sell two derelict properties acquired by the local authority using compulsory purchase order (CPO) powers last year.

At a full meeting of council yesterday evening, councillors approved a proposed property disposal of 118 and 119 Barrack Street for €275,000 plus VAT if applicable.

In a report to councillors ahead of the meeting, the city council’s chief executive, Ann Doherty said the sum “represents the best consideration reasonably obtainable based on an open market sales process and an independent evaluation process”.

Speaking at the meeting, the city council’s director of corporate affairs and international relations, Paul Moynihan said the properties were deemed unsuitable to be developed as social housing by the council's housing directorate. 

Mr Moynihan said the proposed purchaser, currently a business owner on Barrack Street, has a “track record of deliverability” and has proposed a commercial use at lower level with residential above.

Green Party councillor Dan Boyle said he believed the sale of the properties represented the “best option” to redevelop the long derelict site “in the quickest possible time in the most effective way”.

However, Solidarity councillor Fiona Ryan was one of the councillors to voice her opposition to the disposal saying she felt there was a “conflict” if the city council’s housing directorate did not see the benefit of using the site to develop housing itself but a private developer does.

Independent councillor Mick Finn said the derelict properties have “held the street back” from reaching its full potential.

He pointed to the social housing units under construction elsewhere on the street and said he feels there is a need for all types of housing to be developed.

The properties were both placed on the city’s derelict sites register in 2015, and CPO’d by the council along with four prominent derelict buildings on North Main Street in 2021.

A number of conditions are attached to the property disposal, including one which stipulates that the purchaser must "complete the redevelopment and/or refurbishment of the property and removal of dereliction to the satisfaction of Cork City Council within a maximum of two years from the date of closing of the contract for sale".

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