Cork sees highest number of people offered places on Government's Basic Income for the Arts scheme 

In Cork, 212 artists and creative arts workers have been offered a place, the highest figure in the country.
Cork sees highest number of people offered places on Government's Basic Income for the Arts scheme 

Payments of €325 per week will be made to 2,000 eligible artists and creative arts workers during the scheme.

CORK has the highest number of applicants to be offered a place on the Government’s new Basic Income for the Arts (BIA) pilot scheme, figures provided by the Minister for Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and the Media, Catherine Martin have shown.

The minister provided a county-by-county breakdown of the number of applicants offered a place on the scheme in a written reply to a question submitted last week by Fianna Fáil TD for Cavan-Monaghan Niamh Smyth.

Ms Martin said the breakdown may be subject to “minor change” in the event that any artists do not accept the offer of a place on the scheme.

In Cork, 212 artists and creative arts workers have been offered a place, the highest figure in the country, followed by Dublin where 180 applicants have been offered a place and Galway where 148 people have been offered a place.

Participants in the BIA scheme will take part in a three-year research programme to assess the impact of a basic income style payment on the arts sector.

Payments of €325 per week will be made to 2,000 eligible artists and creative arts workers during the scheme.

In her written reply, Ms Martin said over 9,000 applications were made under the scheme with over 8,200 assessed as eligible according to the published guidelines for the scheme.

Eligible applications, she said, were then included in a randomised anonymous selection process to choose the participants which was overseen by EY acting as an independent verifier.

The 2,000 recipients include representatives from all art forms, age groups, ethnicities and counties.

“This is a research project and the main element of the research programme is a longitudinal study with the same survey being delivered every six months for three years. The data collected will inform future Government policy in relation to how best to support artists,” Ms Martin continued.

She said the process of applicants accepting their places on the scheme will be finalised shortly and payments will begin soon.

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