Man told garda at Cork Airport that charge sheets 'will do for toilet paper'

Judge Roberts said the defendant had told Garda Harney to f*** off. The defendant said, “He should toughen up a bit, it is all part of his training.” 
Man told garda at Cork Airport that charge sheets 'will do for toilet paper'

A 57-year-old English man who was handed charge sheets for disruptive behaviour at Cork Airport replied to the garda, “That will do for toilet paper.” Pic; Larry Cummins

A 57-year-old English man who was handed charge sheets for disruptive behaviour at Cork Airport replied to the garda, “That will do for toilet paper.” 

Laughing during his court appearance at Cork District Court where he denied charges against him, he first indicated that he did not want to be sworn in. Judge Colm Roberts said Timothy Hadfield could affirm instead but would have to give a reason not be sworn in. “Do you believe in God?” the judge asked. “I believe in six or seven gods,” Hadfield replied. He then agreed to be sworn in in the usual way.

Denying that he told Garda Michael Harney and airport police to f*** off, he said in court, “For a Divine and sovereign human being I should not even be here.” Asked by his solicitor, Eddie Burke, if he was abusive in the airport he said he was not. “I am more of a rebel – disobedient. My phone was being held by airport police. All I wanted was to get my phone. I bear no ill-will… I met a nice Swiss gentleman at the airport.” 

Garda Harney said the defendant had a logbook and birth cert but no passport.

The defendant said he wanted to find a way on the day of the disputed incident – August 26 – to get to the UK. Judge Roberts said he could have travelled to Northern Ireland and gotten a ferry to Stranraer. The defendant laughed and said to the judge, “Are you suggesting I sneak into my own country?” 

As for being abusive, he said he wasn’t. Judge Roberts said the defendant had told Garda Harney to f*** off. 

The defendant said,

“He should toughen up a bit, it is all part of his training.” 

Mr Burke asked the accused if he would like to apologise for his behaviour at the airport. He said to the judge, “I apologise for wasting your time.” 

The judge convicted him of being abusive and failing to leave the airport when directed to do so. He sentenced him to the amount of time he had already served since his arrest on August 26 and bound him to the peace with a particular condition to stay away from the airport for the next three months.

Judge Roberts asked him if he acknowledged himself bound to the peace, Hadfield replied, “What about peace, love and truth?” Leaving the court, he said to the judge, “All my love, sir. We’ll be alright.” 

Judge Roberts said, “I mean this with the greatest sincerity – I hope I never see you again. Look after yourself.” 

Hadfield, with an address at The Cottage, Coomkeane, Durrus, County Cork, said, “You as well. Thank you.”

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