Cork City Council to explore bicycle lift for steep Cork hill

It follows a motion tabled by Green Party councillor Oliver Moran who asked that the council would look at the feasibility and suitability of establishing a ‘Trampe’ bicycle lift, similar to one in Trondheim in Norway, on York St
Cork City Council to explore bicycle lift for steep Cork hill

Green Party councillor Oliver Moran asked that the council would look at the feasibility and suitability of establishing a ‘Trampe’ bicycle lift, similar to one in Trondheim in Norway, on York St. Picture Denis Minihane.

CORK City Council has agreed to explore the idea of installing a bicycle lift on a steep hill in the city as the National Transport Authority’s (NTA) BusConnects Cork plan progresses.

It follows a motion tabled by Green Party councillor Oliver Moran who asked that the council would look at the feasibility and suitability of establishing a ‘Trampe’ bicycle lift, similar to one in Trondheim in Norway, on York St.

The lift, first installed in Trondheim in 1993, was upgraded and rebranded in 2013 under the name Cyclocable. Users place their right foot on a footplate and are gently pushed upwards while remaining on their bicycle.

In response to the motion, the city council's director of infrastructure development Gerry O'Beirne noted in a report to councillors that the NTA recently published the Sustainable Transport Corridors Report as part of the BusConnects Cork programme and that this report details a potential cycle connection from MacCurtain St to Wellington Rd and beyond via York St.

“The installation of cycling-specific measures/aids such as a bicycle lift as suggested will be explored further with the National Transport Authority as the overall corridor proposals are progressed. The final proposals for each corridor will also be subject to further consultation as part of the planning approval process associated with the corridor improvement works,” the report continued.

Speaking to The Echo, Mr Moran said he believes York St would be an ideal location for such a piece of infrastructure.

“The immediate reason for my requesting the report was that the NTA have suggested a cycle lane up York St. Looking at the area on a map that would seem great. It would connect Mary Elmes Bridge and Harley St to Wellington Rd. The obvious problem in reality is that York St is one of the steepest hills in Cork.

“It's actually a route I use to access the northside by bike, but I have the benefit of an electric bike.

“The idea of bike lift is something that's been mentioned before. Usually, Patrick's Hill is where people imagine one, but York St is probably more practical. It's a shorter straighter route with a very definite purpose,” he said.

“Like the one in Norway, it could be both a practical help for cyclists and an attraction in its own right for the MacCurtain St area,” Mr Moran continued.

The Sustainable Transport Corridors Report was published in April in advance of the more detailed corridor proposals which are expected to be published later this month.

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