President welcomes series of pastoral visits by Bishop Colton to mark centenary of Bandon Valley killings 

This week marks the centenary of the Bandon Valley killings and the funerals which followed in 1922.
President welcomes series of pastoral visits by Bishop Colton to mark centenary of Bandon Valley killings 

To mark the centenary, Church of Ireland Bishop of Cork, Cloyne and Ross, Dr Paul Colton, has been undertaking pastoral visits to the parishes in West Cork that were most affected. Picture Denis Minihane.

The President of Ireland, Michael D Higgins has welcomed the series of pastoral visits by the Church of Ireland Bishop of Cork, Cloyne and Ross, Dr Paul Colton, to mark the centenary of the Bandon Valley killings. 

Fourteen people were killed during the Bandon Valley killings and this week marks the centenary of the events and the funerals which followed in 1922.

To mark the centenary, Church of Ireland Bishop of Cork, Cloyne and Ross, Dr Paul Colton, has been undertaking pastoral visits to the parishes in West Cork that were most affected.

In a tweet from the official President of Ireland account, a spokesperson for the President said: "President Higgins has welcomed @DrPaulColton 's series of pastoral visits this week to mark the centenary of the Bandon Valley killings. As part of a process of ethical remembrance, it is crucial that the voices of all those without exception who were impacted by events are heard."

In the Cork, Cloyne and Ross Diocesan Magazine this month, Bishop Colton wrote that the historiography of that period and those events in the Bandon Valley “has been written about extensively and debated with different narratives, emotions and responses elicited”.

He said: “In that week, 14 people were killed: Michael O’Neill, Thomas Hornibrook, Samuel Hornibrook, Herbert Woods, James Buttimer, David Gray, Francis Fitzmaurice, Robert Howe, John Chinnery, Robert Nagle, Alexander Gerald McKinley, John Buttimer, James Greenfield and John Bradfield.

“Two of those were 16 years of age and the oldest was 82. Twelve were members of the Church of Ireland in this Diocese. Attempts were made on others’ lives and they had to escape, many never to return. We know that in the years that followed many people from Cork, Cloyne and Ross felt insecure in this part of the world and left.” 

Since 2014 Cork, Cloyne and Ross has been commemorating the centenaries of the period 1914 to 2024 in a programme called the Cork, Cloyne and Ross Centenaries Commemoration and Reconciliation Project co-funded by the Church of Ireland Priorities’ Fund. 

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