'Cork has done well but that can change': GP says recent Covid deaths a warning signal

More Covid-19 deaths were recorded in Cork last week than any other county, with Cork also reporting the second-highest number of new cases. 
'Cork has done well but that can change': GP says recent Covid deaths a warning signal

The Cork GP acknowledged that 'everybody is tired of it, and everyone is fed up of Covid; everyone is fed up of the restrictions'. 

A CORK GP has warned that Covid-19 cases may increase, as Cork recorded the highest number of Covid-19 deaths in the country.

More Covid-19 deaths were recorded in Cork last week than any other county, with Cork also reporting the second-highest number of new cases of the virus.

According to newly published data by the Central Statistics Office (CSO), Cork recorded six deaths in the week ending September 17, and was the only county to record more than five deaths in the week.

Given the numbers in hospital and ICU at the moment, Cork GP Dr John Sheehan said it was likely that we would see more people pass away from Covid-19 over the next few months.

Dr Sheehan said that, while the vaccination system had been “very successful”, there would still be some individuals who would get Covid-19. Picture: Dan Linehan
Dr Sheehan said that, while the vaccination system had been “very successful”, there would still be some individuals who would get Covid-19. Picture: Dan Linehan

He said he believed the case numbers would increase in Cork as schools and colleges returned, and he urged people to ensure they did not become “complacent”.

Nationally, 21 deaths were recorded among confirmed Covid-19 cases last week.

The latest figures bring the total number of Covid-19 deaths recorded in Cork since the beginning of the pandemic to 437.

A total of 8,662 cases of the virus were reported nationally for last week, a decrease of 8% from the previous week.

Cork had the second-highest number of new cases (755) for that week.

The CSO figures show that 32,444 cases of the virus have been reported in Cork since the beginning of the pandemic.

Dr Sheehan said that, while the vaccination system had been “very successful”, there would still be some individuals who would get Covid-19.

He said that, unfortunately, over the next few months more people would died from the virus.

“Given the numbers in hospital and the numbers in ICU, we are going to see people pass away from Covid,” he said.

Warning to keep guard up 

He stated that it sent “a warning signal” to the people of Cork to ensure they do not become complacent.

“Cork overall has done very, very well... but that obviously can change.

“A year ago, Donegal and the border counties were really under pressure, Dublin was really struggling at another stage, so it does move around, and it shows you that this virus continues to challenge in terms of its infectivity and its dangers.”

He said he believed the case numbers would increase in Cork as schools and colleges returned, and reminded people to keep their guard up.

“Everybody is tired of it, and everyone is fed up of Covid; everyone is fed up of the restrictions. 

“A lot of things are back to some element of normality now but, even within that normality, I think it is important that we’re just a little bit cautious and we don’t lose the run of ourselves, that we still keep the handwashing, the masks, and the distancing as much as possible because that has really made a big difference.”

LEA figures 

Meanwhile, two local electoral areas (LEA) in Cork have recorded 14-day incidence rates higher than the national average, with increases in Covid cases across four areas.

According to the latest data from the Covid-19 data hub — which details the 14-day incidence rate of the virus per 100,000 people for each LEA up to Monday, September 20 — Mallow LEA had the highest 14-day incidence rate in the county.

There were 196 confirmed cases in the LEA over the 14-day period, an incidence rate of 672.2, which was well above the national average of 389.8 per 100,000 of the population.

Skibbereen-West Cork LEA was also above the national average, with its 14-day incidence rate standing at 488.8, with 148 confirmed cases.

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