HIQA inspection led to 'urgent action plans' to address issues at Cork nursing home 

HIQA inspection led to 'urgent action plans' to address issues at Cork nursing home 

A Hiqa inspection was carried out at St Joseph’s Hospital in the Bon Secours Care Village on Lee Road on 28 January 2021.

A number of “urgent action plans” were issued by inspectors at a Cork nursing home earlier this year, according to a Health Information and Quality Authority (Hiqa) report.

A Hiqa inspection was carried out at St Joseph’s Hospital in the Bon Secours Care Village on Lee Road on 28 January 2021.

The centre was found to be substantially compliant and compliant across a number of areas, though it was found to be “not compliant” under some regulations.

At the time of the inspection, the centre was coping with an outbreak of Covid-19 and the report noted that there was evidence that care and support from staff was “exceptional” during this time.

The inspector noted how staff had worked increased hours to ensure that residents had good care and they were visibly upset by the deaths of a number of the frailer residents from COVID-19.

Similar to findings on the previous inspection, inspectors found the annual review for 2020 had not been fully actioned in relation to the need for increased clinical, observational assessments to ensure that the service was in line with the aims and objectives of the centre.

On this inspection, this resulted in the issuing of a number of urgent action plans under governance and management, medicine management and staff training and development.

Some of the issues noted under training staff and development included that staff did not ensure that the external door was kept closed in one section where residents were in isolation and key staff were seen leaving the unit while dressed in PPE, even though the policy was for the staff to cohort within the unit while the virus was active.

Inspectors observed that the majority of staff were adhering to infection control guidelines.

However, an urgent action plan was issued to the provider as a number of breaches of policy and protocol were seen which linked back to lack of supervision and follow-up.

A number of concerns were also found in relation to medicine management, which resulted in an urgent action plan being issued.

The inspector stated that staff had administered medicines without a prescription, while a number of medicines which had been transcribed without authorisation were not transcribed correctly, not signed by the transcribers and did not state the route by which the medicine was to be administered.

In conclusion, inspectors found that there were a number of issues identified on this inspection which required urgent management attention to maintain and sustain best practice though each area was to be addressed by certain dates over the weeks that followed.

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