UCC appoints Ireland's first-ever Chair in Neonatology

UCC appoints Ireland's first-ever Chair in Neonatology

Prof. Eugene Dempsey, the new Horgan Chair in Neonatology, Infant Centre, UCC and Consultant Neonatologist at CUMH, Prof. John O’Halloran, Interim President, Professor Helen Whelton, Head of the College of Medicine and Health (COMH) UCC, Prof. Geraldine Boylan, Director INFANT Centre, UCC.

University College Cork’s (UCC) INFANT Research Centre has announced the creation of the first-ever Chair in Neonatology.

The news comes following a one million euro donation from alumnus Daragh Horgan and his wife Anne to support ongoing research at the centre.

INFANT is Ireland’s only dedicated research centre spanning maternal and child health and is focussed entirely on pioneering translational research that will improve outcomes for women, babies and young children.

It is a leading health innovation and research hub, headquartered at UCC and co-located in Cork University Maternity Hospital (CUMH) and Cork University Hospital (CUH) campus.

The Horgans’ support has culminated in the appointment of Prof Eugene Dempsey as the Horgan Chair in Neonatology, following an international search, to secure the research capacity and to deliver on the INFANT vision.

Daragh Horgan said that improving care for newborn or pre-term babies is “vital” for their long-term outcomes, the impact it has on their families, and on the cost to society as a whole.

The new Horgan Chair in Neonatology and Consultant Neonatologist at CUMH, Professor Eugene Dempsey, said that the role represents an “exciting opportunity to grow our world-leading research programme in newborn care”.

Over the next five years, we will continue to develop strong international collaborative links in newborn clinical trials. We will lead and partner in some of these exciting multinational trials all aiming to generate new knowledge and enhance patient outcome.

“These trials encompass many important aspects of clinical care including newborn stabilisation at delivery, studying antiseizure medication in full-term newborns and measuring brain oxygen levels non-invasively in preterm infants.

“We will continue to deliver high-quality evidence-based clinical care to our families. We will also establish a centre for newborn neurocritical care given our research and clinical strength in this area whilst also ensuring that we train the next generation of neonatal academic scientists through close alignment with our undergraduate and postgraduate teaching programs at UCC,” he said.

Interim President of UCC, Professor John O’Halloran, thanked Mr and Mrs Horgan on behalf of the university “for their generous gift to help create this first-ever Chair in Neonatology in Ireland”.

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