Cork City Council Women's Caucus launched as part of International Women's Day

Cork City Council Women's Caucus launched as part of International Women's Day

Cllr Mary Rose Desmond. Pic: Cork City Council website

Cork City Council’s new Women’s Caucus has officially launched with a social media video campaign to mark International Women’s Day and the creation of the caucus which aims to encourage women to get involved in politics.

Cork City Council’s Women’s Caucus has been set up with the aim to increase women’s engagement and representation in local politics.

Speaking on the launch, Lord Mayor of Cork, Cllr Joe Kavanagh said the videos, created by videographer and photographer, Clare Keogh, explore what inspired female city councillors to enter politics, the challenges they face as female representatives and what changes they believe must be taken to ensure local democracy is more representative, inclusive and diverse”.

“The videos really highlight the motivations and challenges facing women politicians so please watch and share so that awareness around these issues and our new Women’s Caucus is amplified at a local, national and international level,” he said.

Councillor Fiona Kerins said that the videos "really highlight the motivations and challenges facing women politicians".

Within the three videos, the female councillors shared their personal stories and reflected on the role of women in local politics.

Cork City Council’s Women’s Caucus Chair, Cllr Mary Rose Desmond described the formation of the caucus as a “positive development which will see us, as a group across the political divide, working together to encourage women to get involved in local politics.” 

Speaking to The Echo, Cllr Desmond said that the main aim of the Women's Caucus is to encourage more women to get involved in politics. 

With six out of 31 Cork City Councillors female, she described the current female representation in City Council as “exceptionally low” and said that the members wanted to ensure that they address the issue as elected representatives.

“We felt, in our conversations, that not doing our bit and stepping up to do it more locally with a Cork focus would really be shirking the responsibility that we have as elected women to council,” she added.

She described the caucus, which is a cross-party initiative, as “very significant”.

“While we have diverse political views, that doesn’t mean that we can’t work together to improve the situation and encourage women into politics and encourage public representation to reflect the society that we have,” she said.

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