Man sighted in Cork with bow and arrow ‘for fun’ ordered to complete 200 hours of community service 

Man sighted in Cork with bow and arrow ‘for fun’ ordered to complete 200 hours of community service 

The man charged with having it as a weapon capable of causing injury claimed that he just had it for fun and firing at things in a field. Picture: iStock

Armed gardaí rushed to Cattle Market Avenue in Cork to investigate an unusual sighting of a man with a bow and arrow at 6.30pm in the evening.

The man charged with having it as a weapon capable of causing injury claimed that he just had it for fun and firing at things in a field. 

The judge did not believe him and ordered him to do 200 hours of community service.

His friend was before Cork District Court charged with having an extendable baton on the same occasion but he denied that it was his. 

Again Judge Olann Kelleher said he did not believe the defence evidence and he jailed this accused for six months.

31-year-old John O’Driscoll of Cuan Aoibhin, Lower Killeens, Blackstone Bridge, Cork, denied having the baton.

However, Judge Olann Kelleher convicted him of this offence and sentenced him to six months in jail.

20-year-old Morgan Griffin of 111 Churchfield Avenue, admitted having the bow and arrow but denied that he had it as a weapon capable of causing injury or incapacitating. 

Judge Kelleher said he could do 200 hours of community service instead of serving five months in prison.

His solicitor, Frank Buttimer, said Morgan Griffin went to The Range store in Little Island two hours earlier on that date - May 16 2019 – and bought the bow and arrow.

Mr Buttimer said, “He bought it for fun in a local field shooting some arrows.” 

Garda Keith Aher said Griffin would not give any explanation for what he was doing with a bow and arrow on the occasion or when questioned afterwards.

“If he made any reasonable attempt to account for it it might have been dealt with differently,” Garda Aher said.

Sergeant Pat Lyons asked Garda Aher if the man with the bow and arrow had “given you any indication he was taking up archery as a pastime?” 

Garda Aher said Griffin had not given such an indication.

Griffin also had a Stanley knife in the car with him and he said he used that for his work as a plasterer even though he did not travel to work in that car. He was also convicted of having that knife. The community service order will cover that offence also.

As for O’Driscoll, he told Garda Rory Fogarty the baton was his when they were dealing with him that day.

However, in court he said that it belonged to his friend, Darren O’Hara of Glenryan Road. Asked why he didn’t say that on the day, he said, “I didn’t want to rat him out.” 

Darren O’Hara of Glenryan Road, who was not charged with any offence, gave evidence to say that he bought the baton on the internet from China for less than €10.

In court Sergeant Pat Lyons flicked out the extendable baton and said to O’Hara, if it was his, how would he shorten the baton again? He handed the extended baton to him in the witness box. O’Hara said he didn’t know how to do it.

Judge Kelleher said he did not believe the evidence of O’Hara or of the two defendants.

The judge suggested that the Director of Public Prosecutions examine the sworn evidence given by the parties in the case with a view to the possibility of further proceedings.

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