Cork politicians 'ready, willing and able' for General Election

Cork politicians 'ready, willing and able' for General Election
A ballot paper during the count at General Election 2016.

CANDIDATES in Cork are ready to go for an election: it is just a matter of pressing print.

That is the message from north and south of the River Lee, with many members ready for a pre-Christmas election.

If the Dáil dissolves after Tuesday's motion of no confidence, an election is likely to fall between December 15 and 23.

"I am not taking no for an answer," Senator Colm Burke told the Evening Echo, confirming that he will be seeking to be on the Fine Gael ticket in Cork North Central.

"I love the area and feel that I have done good work here but there are still a lot of issues that need to be dealt with and I want to run here.” 

Cllr Kenneth O'Flynn: "Ready, willing and able" for an election.
Cllr Kenneth O'Flynn: "Ready, willing and able" for an election.

For Fianna Fáil, there is a host of candidates seeking to join Billy Kelleher on the ticket, with Cllr Kenneth O'Flynn saying, "I'm ready, willing and able - it's only a matter of pressing print."

He added that the party is 'raring to go', whichever candidate is selected.

Senator Jerry Buttimer: Will be seeking a nomination in Cork South Central
Senator Jerry Buttimer: Will be seeking a nomination in Cork South Central

Senator Jerry Buttimer, who lost his Dáil seat in the last election, is set to return in a bid to secure his seat in South Central.

“As far as I know, as of today, I am seeking a nomination in the constituency of Cork South Central,” he said.

"My focus will be to regain a seat for Fine Gael in Cork South Central so that we have a strong, stable government."

Some in Cork maintain that the main parties will suffer in a snap election.

Solidarity TD Mick Barry said that Fine Gael and Fianna Fáil stand to lose out at the hands of a strong youth vote, mobilised by the 8th Amendment issue.

Mick Barry: "Fianna Fáil and Fine Gael are going to take a hit."
Mick Barry: "Fianna Fáil and Fine Gael are going to take a hit."

“My sense is that even people who want an election soon don’t want it over the Christmas holidays but I think Fianna Fáil and Fine Gael are going to take the hit for this rather than the left or independents,” he told the Evening Echo.

“Many of those are young people who are also affected by the housing crisis, by precarious work and low pay and I really hope that young people do come out to vote in big numbers and vote for change.” 

Green party representative Oliver Moran said that the general public has no appetite for an election.

“You’re competing with Santa, you’re competing with the Late Late Toy Show, all these kinds of things are more important to people right now," he said.

Labour's Kathleen Lynch said that her party is ready to fight for votes but warned the established parties that there is no appetite among the population for an election.

She said, "In the run up to Christmas, as the weather turns and the roads get slippy, the last thing people want is someone knocking on the door. The country doesn't need another election - we need a government who is strong enough to make the right decision and, at the moment, I don't think this one can do that."

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