Cool Jack’s sunshine songs give feelgood factor to Marquee

Cool Jack’s sunshine songs give feelgood factor to Marquee
Jack Johnson performing in Live At The Marquee. Pic Darragh Kane

IT was music to suit the weather. Jack Johnson’s sunshine songs brought a feelgood factor to a balmy night.

The Hawaiin surfer-turned-singer enchanted the Live at the Marquee crowds with his chilled out vibe and mellow melodies.

Kathryn O'Callaghan, Leaghnamore and Charlotte Spencer, The Lough going to see Jack Johnson. Pic Darragh Kane
Kathryn O'Callaghan, Leaghnamore and Charlotte Spencer, The Lough going to see Jack Johnson. Pic Darragh Kane

Making his Marquee debut in front of more than 4,000 Corkonians, Johnson delivered an intimate gig that, at times, felt like a relaxing sing-song around a beach campfire with friends. His music conjures up images of a Hawaiian paradise, of surfers singing after a day on the waves. Like most great artists, his songs are a reflection of his own life.

Claire Hourihan, Douglas and Ellen Ryall, Midelton going to see Jack Johnson in Live At The Marquee. Pic Darragh Kane
Claire Hourihan, Douglas and Ellen Ryall, Midelton going to see Jack Johnson in Live At The Marquee. Pic Darragh Kane

He was born and raised on the island of Oahu, and at the age of 17 became the youngest invitee to make the finals of the Pipeline Masters, one of surfing’s most prestigious events.

A potential career as a professional surfer — a sport that remains his first love — ended abruptly when he suffered an accident that left him with 150 stitches in his forehead.

Ailbhe and Frances O'Brien, Carrigaline going to see Jack Johnson in Live At The Marquee. Pic Darragh Kane
Ailbhe and Frances O'Brien, Carrigaline going to see Jack Johnson in Live At The Marquee. Pic Darragh Kane

The accident became the inspiration for his hit song Drink the Water.

Johnson told the Marquee audience of his fond memories of surfing the Irish coastline and thanked them for making him feel at home.

Julie Molloy and Tracey Quinn, Douglas going to see Jack Johnson in Live At The Marquee. Pic Darragh Kane
Julie Molloy and Tracey Quinn, Douglas going to see Jack Johnson in Live At The Marquee. Pic Darragh Kane

He rewarded the crowds with his full repertoire, combining laid-back acoustic instrumentation with hints of reggae and hip-hop. He has what many of his own idols possessed — he’s cool.

Listening to Johnson live, it’s easy to recognise his greatest influences — Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendrix, Otis Redding and Bob Marley have helped define his career.

Tracey Gallagher, Mallow and Tricia O'Donovan, Cobh going to see Jack Johnson. Pic Darragh Kane
Tracey Gallagher, Mallow and Tricia O'Donovan, Cobh going to see Jack Johnson. Pic Darragh Kane

Last night, he combined his most popular songs — Upside Down, Banana Pancakes, Bubble Toes, Fortunate Fool, and Breakdown — with some of his lesser-known works.

He referenced Donald Trump, saying his Presidency was as “weird” for Americans as it was for the rest of the world.

His song My Mind is For Sale is a protest, of sorts, against Trump, calling for ‘love not hate’.

Sinead Crowley, Clonakilty and Andrew Harper, Kilkenny going to see Jack Johnson in Live At The Marquee. Pic Darragh Kane
Sinead Crowley, Clonakilty and Andrew Harper, Kilkenny going to see Jack Johnson in Live At The Marquee. Pic Darragh Kane

He saved his biggest hit for last, Better Together, and the audience swayed gently and sang at the top of their voices.

It was a hot, sticky, joyous night in the big tent. It felt like summer would last forever.

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